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ORDINATIONS.

PROVINCIAL

wards's tutor,) delivered a most effective sermon to the people, from the words, “En. courage him."

Collections were made at the close of the Rev. David Nimmo.

services, in aid of the chapel funds, amount. On Friday, April 14, 1843, the Rev.

ing to 201. 58. David Nimmo was ordained to the pastoral office over the church and congregation as- Rev. Joseph Davenport Elliott. sembling for Divine worship in the Tempe- On Wednesday, the 26th July, the Rev. rance Hall, Bolton. The Rev. J. Dyson, of

Joseph Davenport Elliott, of the Western Halshaw Moor, introduced the service by College, Exeter, was publicly set apart, in reading the Scriptures and prayer; a dis- Mawdsley-street Chapel, Bolton, Lancashire, course, explanatory of a Christian church

to the pastoral office amongst the Independent on Congregational principles, was delivered Dissenters, and recognized as the pastor of by the Rev. J. Griffin, of Manchester, who the church in that place. The chapel was asked the usual questions; the ordination crowded with a most respectable audience, prayer was offered by the above J. Dyson ; and above thirty of the neighbouring ministhe charge to the minister was given by the

ters were present to sanction the important Rev. S. Ellis, of Bolton; the sermon to object. The following was the order of the the people was preached in the evening, in service :Duke's-alley Chapel, by the Rev. John After a hymn had been sung, the Rev. S. G ther, of Manchester.

Ellis, of Duke's-alley chapel, Bolton, read a This is a new interest, raised by the town portion of the sacred Scriptures, and prayed; mission in Bolton.

the Rev. R. Vaughan, D.D., President of the Lancashire Independent College, deli

vered the introductory discourse; the Rev. Rev. W. Eduards.

J. Clunie, LL.D., of Manchester, proposed On Tuesday, July 18th, the Rev. W. the usual questions; the Rev. R. Fletcher, Edwards, late of Cotton End Academy, was of Grosvenor-street Chapel, Manchester, ordained to the Christian ministry, at Castle offered the ordination prayer; the Rev. G. Donington, Leicestershire ; and although the Payne, LL.D., Theological Professor of the weather was extremely unfavourable, the Western College, Exeter, gave the charge to chapel was crowded with people from the the minister; the Rev. T. Raffles, LL.D., town and neighbourhood. There was also a of Liverpool, preached to the people ; and, goodly gathering of ministers from the coun- in the absence of the Rev. T. Greenall, of ties of Leicester, Nottingham, and Derby. Burnley, the Rev. R. Slate, of Preston, conThe services were opened by the Rev. J. J.

cluded with prayer. Owen, Baptist minister, resident in the place; after which the Rev. T. Mayo, of

TESTIMONIAL OF ESTEEM Wigston, gave a lucid exhibition of our principles as Congregational Dissenters.

to the Rev. S. Ellis, minister of Duke's The Rev. J. Roberts, of Melton Mowbray,

alley Chapel, Bolton, on occasion of his reasked the usual questions, and offered the tirement from a pastorate which he had held

for sixteen years. ordination prayer, with the imposition of hands. The questions proposed were re

Letter to the Rev. Samuel Ellis. plied to by Mr. Edwards, with great pru

Sept. 27, 1843. dence and ability. His reasons for dissent- " Rev. and dear Sir,-A number of your ing from the Established Church were such

people, desirous of testifying their esteem as did honour to him as a Christian and a

for you, as their pastor, have resolved to minister, while the spirit in which they were present you with a small token of their given told no less for his piety than for his regard. ability ; nor has it been our privilege to

“They regret exceedingly that, after a listen to a more luminous exhibition of the laborious ministry of sixteen years among great and fundamental truths of the gospel them, the connexion which has subsisted than was delivered by him upon the occasion. between you and them should cease; and The Rev. J. Gawthorn, of Derby, delivered while they look with thankfulness on the to the newly-ordained minister a most solemn good effected by your instrumentality, they and impressive charge, and the services of

sincerely pray that, by the circumstance of the morning were concluded by the Rev. W. your removal, it may not be blighted or Klaht, of Melbourne.

checked. In the evening, the Rev. J. Ault, of Rep- “ Although the dispensation is to them ton, opened the service, by reading the afflictive and trying in an eminent degree, Scriptures and prayer; after which, the they rejoice that you, their beloved pastor, Rev. J. Frost, of Cotton End, (Mr. Ed- leave them without a stain on your cha

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fortune and generosity, might be led thereby could not repel their devotedness-heaven's to reflect on the following subjects; viz., heroism went with them still, to enlighten, the immense and lasting benefit that would to renovate, and to reclaim. accrue to the eternal welfare of thousands of The little worshippers left behind may our fellow-creatures by the appropriation of wander over the four quarters of the wide such a sum towards the advancement of the earth, but will never lose the remembrance Redeemer's kingdom, if it were properly of Eliza and her pious teachings. Some few managed. From the 60,0001., we would may date an eternity of happiness from their take 20,0001., to build three Protestant little meetings; others may sadly remember chapels of sufficient dimensions to accom- them as a rebuke to their maturer years; modate 400 hearers each, as well as four but forget them-never. school-rooms to contain 150 children each. The better to qualify herself for the work, Thus would 1,800 idividuals receive religious Eliza attended the « Home and Colonial instruction, not for the limited term of a Infant School Society”-that dispenser of year or even a century, but from generation blessedness to the rising generation, whose to generation, as long as time shall endure. bread cast on the waters is found of and Yea, more than this could be done ; for we feeds the lambs in localities, from shore to would place the remaining 40,0001. (making shore, leading them into green pastures, 200,000 dollars) on mortgage here at the from out the desert world. Mauritius, at 7 per cent. per annum, which It there soon became evident, that she had would yield 14,000 dollars, a year's interest, a peculiar gift and tact for drawing out the and wonld enable us to grant perpetual faculties of very young children, and raising salaries to

their affections upward. Intelligent and

Dollars pious parents of the better circles were also Six Missionaries, at 1,000 dollars each per an. 6,000 Four Schoolmasters, at 600 dollars,

2,400

quick to perceive, that in a well organized Four Schoolmistresses, at 360 dollars, ditto 1,440 juvenile school, the children of the indigent Two Evangelists, at 600 dollars, ditto

1,200

partook of facilities and advantages in the Salary to Superintendent.....

1,200

attainment of the real and the excellent, 12,210 more efficient far than those caged up

in There would still remain in hand the sum

close rooms with the solitary teacher could of 1,760 dollars to be yearly put by for the

command. repairs of the chapels and school-rooms.

It was also suggested to Eliza, that the There are not wanting in England, Scotland,

offspring of the influential parent, rightly and Ireland, noble-minded gentlemen who

trained, had more extensive means in their could do this for the cause of Christ, not

power of disseminating good than the needs only in the island of Mauritius, but also in

labouring poor; and that by raising a school Madagascar, without causing the least pre

for such, she wonld thereby considerably judice to their families. Yea, all the earthly

extend her own usefulness. glory of emperors, kings, and dukes would This and other causes combining, induced be eclipsed by such a generous act of muni.

the widowed mother to give up her spacious ficence. Even the glory of the Duke of

cheerful premises, which hare been admiWellington would be as nothing compared

rably fitted up for the purpose, and there to this glorious display of Christian benevo

this lady's highly-favoured child, aided by lence and zeal.

two sisters, commenced her labours of love I hope and trust his grace the Duke will

with six resident infant children, whose age be the first to show the good example.

averaged about four years or less, and a fer JOHN LE BRUN,

others living near. They lately underwent Missionary Thirty Years in the field.

an examination, when their intelligence and

tractability fully evinced that the work was Port Louis, Mauritius,

blessed of the Lord. The parents defray April, 1843.

the actual expenses only, at a very moderate estimate, gain not being the desired object.

And there Eliza, in all humility and deTHE SCHOOL IN THE LANE.

votedness, occupies that post in his vineyard Continued from No. 240, January, 1840. assigned by her heavenly Father, and for Tbe love and zeal of Eliza and her orphan

which he has so eminently qualified her friend Maria did not forsake them on leaving -happy, most happy in alluring praise Ryde, and its green lane. Though nature from babes and sucklings, of whom it is in all ber alluring forms had harmonized written that “of such is the kingdom of with, it did not originate the vitality within. heaven.” May many emulate example Bleak wintry winds were soon to deface that of piety and usefulness. lovely scenery; but the fetid air, the fre

E. G. W. quent oath, the squalid child, and the scof- 36, Church-street, Chelsea. fing parent, in the densely crowded alleys to which they had now to transfer their labours,

PROVINCIAL.

ORDINATIONS.

wards's tntor,) delivered a most effective serinon to the people, from the words, “Encourage him.”

Collections were made at the close of the services, in aid of the chapel funds, amount. ing to 201. 58.

Rev. David Nimmo. On Friday, April 14, 1843, the Rev. David Nimmo was ordained to the pastoral office over the church and congregation assembling for Divine worship in the Temperance Hall, Bolton. The Rev. J. Dyson, of Halshaw Moor, introduced the service by reading the Scriptures and prayer; a discourse, explanatory of a Christian church on Congregational principles, was delivered by the Rev. J. Griffin, of Manchester, who asked the usual questions; the ordination prayer was offered by the above J. Dyson ; the charge to the minister was given by the Rev. S. Ellis, of Bolton; the sermon to the people was preached the evening, in Duke's-alley Chapel, by the Rev. John Gwyther, of Manchester.

This is a new interest, raised by the town mission in Bolton.

Rev. Joseph Davenport Elliott. On Wednesday, the 26th July, the Rev. Joseph Davenport Elliott, of the Western College, Exeter, was publicly set apart, in Mawdsley-streetChapel, Bolton, Lancashire, to the pastoral office amongst the Independent Dissenters, and recognized as the pastor of the church in that place. The chapel was crowded with a most respectable audience, and above thirty of the neighbouring ministers were present to sanction the important object. The following was the order of the service :

After a hymn had been sung, the Rev. S. Ellis, of Duke's-alley chapel, Bolton, read a portion of the sacred Scriptures, and prayed; the Rev. R. Vaughan, D.D., President of the Lancashire Independent College, deli. vered the introductory discourse; the Rev. J. Clunie, LL.D., of Manchester, proposed the usual questions; the Rev. R. Fletcher, of Grosvenor-street Chapel, Manchester, offered the ordination prayer; the Rev. G. Payne, LL.D., Theological Professor of the Western College, Exeter, gave the charge to the minister ; the Rev. T. Raffles, LL.D., of Liverpool, preached to the people; and, in the absence of the Rev. T. Greenall, of Burnley, the Rev. R. Slate, of Preston, concluded with prayer.

Rev. W. Edwards. On Tuesday, July 18th, the Rev. W. Edwards, late of Cotton End Academy, was ordained to the Christian ministry, at Castle Donington, Leicestershire; and although the weather was extremely unfavourable, the chapel was crowded with people from the town and neighbourhood. There was also a goodly gathering of ministers from the counties of Leicester, Nottingham, and Derby. The services were opened by the Rev. J. J. Owen, Baptist minister, resident in the place; after which the Rev. T. Mayo, of Wigston, gave a lucid exhibition of our principles as Congregational Dissenters. The Rev. J. Roberts, of Melton Mowbray, asked the usual questions, and offered the ordination prayer, with the imposition of hands. The questions proposed were replied to by Mr. Edwards, with great prudence and ability. His reasons for dissenting from the Established Church were such as did honour to him as a Christian and a minister, while the spirit in which they were given told no less for his piety than for his ability ; nor has it been our privilege to listen to a more luminous exhibition of the great and fundamental truths of the gospel than was delivered by him upon the occasion. The Rev. J. Gawthorn, of Derby, delivered to the newly-ordained minister a most solemn and impressive charge, and the services of the morning were concluded by the Rev. W. Klaht, of Melbourne.

In the evening, the Rev. J. Ault, of Repton, opened the service, by reading the Scriptures and prayer; after which, the Rev. J. Frost, of Cotton End, (Mr. Ed

a

TESTIMONIAL OF ESTEEM to the Rev. S. Ellis, minister of Duke's alley Chapel, Bolton, on occasion of his retirement from a pastorate which he had held for sixteen years. Letter to the Rev. Samuel Ellis.

Sept. 27, 1843. " Rev. and dear Sir,-A number of your people, desirous of testifying their esteem for you, as their pastor, have resolved to present you

with small token of their regard.

“ They regret exceedingly that, after a laborious ministry of sixteen years among them, the connexion which has subsisted between you and them should cease; and while they look with thankfulness on the good effected by your instrumentality, they sincerely pray that, by the circumstance of your removal, it may not be blighted or checked.

“ Although the dispensation is to them afflictive and trying in an eminent degree, they rejoice that you, their beloved pastor, leave them without a stain on your cha. high character, standing, and talents of Mr. MʻAll peculiarly fit him for this very important station. May the great Head of the church bless the union, and render it exceedingly conducive to the promotion of his glory, and the prosperity of his cause !

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racter ; and feel that it would be ungrateful in them not to admire the grace of God in you, as exhibited in past and present usefulness, and in unabated, yea, increased attachment to our Saviour's cause; and they trust, that the souls brought to the knowledge of the truth by the blessing of God upon your labours, will be your theme of rejoicing throughout the countless ages of eternity.

“ Your acceptance of the gold watch accompanying this note is requested by them ; and they feel that all that is left for them to do, is to commend you to the guardianship of the great Head of the church, praying that wheresoever your future lot, under His direction, may be cast, you may enjoy his favour and his smile, and that your last days my be your best days, more useful, more honoured, and more blessed."

Rev. Samuel Ellis's Reply. • My dear Friends,-I thank you sincerely for the handsome present which has been conveyed to me as a token of your regard, and for the letter accompanying it, in which you kindly express your approval of may past services among you, and your best wishes for my future happiness and success.

“ At the close of so long a pastorate in Bolton, it is no small pleasure for me to be assured of your continued, earnest affection. The testimonial of your esteem, which you have spontaneously offered, I most gladly accept. When I shall be placed amid other scenes, it will serve as an associating link still connecting me with you; and while it faithfully indicates to me the hour of the passing day, it will be also a remembrancer of years gone by-years which were spent not unusefully in the assiduous duties of the Christian ministry among you.

“ Fervently praying for your present and everlasting welfare, " I remain, my dear friends, “ Yours faithfully and affectionately,

“ SAMUEL Ellis. Bolton, Sept. 29, 1843."

SURREY MISSION. The Autumnal Meeting of this Society was held on Tuesday, the 3rd of October, in West-street Chapel, Dorking, when Mr. E. G. Bromfield, the Society's agent at Elstead, was ordained to the work of the Christian ministry. The Rev. James Hill, of Clapham, commenced the services of the day by reading the Scriptures and prayer; the Rev. J. E. Richards, of Wandsworth, proposed the usual questions, and received the confession of faith; the Rev. S. Percy, of Guildford, offered the ordination prayer ; the Rev. G. Collison, Theological Tutor of Hackney College, delivered the charge; the Rev. John Hunt, of Brixton-hill, addressed the congregation on the duty and importance of increased efforts on behalf of the Society; and the Rev. S. A. Dubourg closed the service with prayer.

In the afternoon, about sixty friends of the society dined together in the British school-rooms adjoining the chapel.

A public meeting was held in the evening, at which J. T. Graham, Esq., M.D., of Epsom, presided; the Rev. J. E. Richards, one of the secretaries, read an interesting statement of facts, respecting the success which has attended the efforts of the agents of the society; and the meeting was addressed by the Revs. J. M. Soule, of Battersea ; J. Hill, of Clapham; S. A. Du. bourg, of Clapham ; J. Burnet, of Camberwell; R. Connebee, Dorking; and S. Percy, of Guildford.

The whole of the services were of a deeply interesting nature, and produced a powerful impression on a large and respectable con. gregation.

CASTLE-GATE, NOTTINGHAM. We feel great pleasure in informing our readers, that the church and congregation assembling in Castle-gate Chapel, Nottingham, which, in April last, were bereft of their pastor by the removal of the Rev. Dr. Alliott to Lambeth, are now happily settled with another minister. The Rev. Samuel M'All, brother of the late Dr. M'All, of Manchester, and who has usefully and successfully laboured at Doncaster for thirteen years, has accepted their unanimous and cordial invitation, and commenced his ministry on the second sabbath in October, under very encouraging circumstances. The

HEMEL HEMSTEAD. On Tuesday, September the 26th, a series of very interesting and somewhat peculiar services was held at the once Wesleyan, but now Independent chapel, the object of which was twofold :—The organization of a number of Christians, formerly Wesleyans, into a Congregational church; and the recognition of the Rev. J. Price, once a local preacher, as their pastor. The Rev. T. Hopley, Baptist minister in the town, com. menced by the reading of the Scriptures and prayer ; the Rev. J. Bull, of Newport Pag. nel, then delivered a lucid and argumentative discourse, explanatory of the principles of a Christian church ; after which he pro

posed the following questions to the candi. Rev. J. Fernie, of Bushey, offering the redates for Congregationalism: Whether they cognition prayer; the Rev. J. Price, in agreed to the principles expounded, and fully reply to questions proposed by the Rev. resolved to act them out ? Whether they T. G. Stamper, expressed his cordial acchose the Rev. J. Price to be their pastor ? ceptance of the pastorate, and briefly stated and if they consented to have two persons his views of the cardinal doctrines of the (whose names were mentioned) to be dea. gospel ; the Rev. T. G. Stamper then decons ? To each of these questions, in order, livered to him a solemn and affectionate they publicly and unanimously signified their charge, founded on 1 Timothy iv. 15; the assent. The church being now formed, ju- duties of the church to their pastor were dicious and affectionate cou els were ad.

clearly explained and powerfully enforced dressed to the deacons and members, by the by the Rev. D. Thomas, of Chesham : his Rev. W. Payne (Baptist), of Chesham, and discourse was founded upon Jeremiah iii. the Rev. J. Robinson, of Luton. The morn- 15, first clause. ing engagements were concluded by the ad. The Rev. Messrs. Bartlett, of Chenies; ministration of the Lord's supper; the Rev. Heathcote, of Berkhamstead; - Wake, of T. G. Stamper, of Uxbridge, presided ; and Market-street (Baptist); and W. Thomas, Christians of various churches and deno- of Saundersfoot, near Tenby, Pembrokeminations united in the celebration of this shire, aided in conducting the devotional evangelic ordinance.

exercises of the day. The evening service commenced by the

General Chronicle.

coxGREGATIONAL UNION OF IRELAND, “Repeal the Legislative Union, and give

[We beg earnestly to recommend the ob- us our own Parliament," exclaim thousands jects embraced by the Congregational Union of her sons. “Adopt at once coercive meaof Ireland, to the friends of the gospel in sures-put down the Papists, and re-estathis country. We sincerely believe that there blish the glorious Protestant Ascendency," is not in the sister country a stronger bul. exclaim thousands more. Volumes would wark against Popery, than the Congrega- fail to record the recipes prescribed by emtional churches. But they are poor, and pirics or soberminded physicians to heal the need sympathy and pecuniary aid ! We land. Numbers who profess that they would shall gladly receive contributions on their serve her if they could, have become weary behalf.-Editor.]

in hearing about her, and seem abandoning No subject is more discussed in Parlia- her to her fate, judging her case hopeless ment, in the Cabinet, in the newspapers, without an interposition of Providence next than Ireland.

to miraculous. To judge of her importance by the amount But there are Christians in Ireland acof thought and time bestowed on her, we quainted with the country, and there are should pronounce no price too great with Christians elsewhere acquainted with the which to purchase her welfare. But with Bible, who think they see a bow of promise capabilities which, rightly directed, would in the cloud that now appears to have settled place her high and blessed among the na- on her destinies, and who have an instrutions, and after being for centuries in Eng. mentality which, by the blessing of God, can land's care—from the Giant's Causeway to achieve for her what nothing else can do. Cape Clear she is rent with distractions, Reader, God's “ saving health" can cure masses of her population are sunk in Ireland's maladies--the " Sun of Righteouswretchedness hardly to be believed by those ness" arising, will dissipate Ireland's gloom who have not seen it, while their minds and -the preaching of the cross can do for Ireconsciences are held spell-bound by anti- land, and sooner or later shall do for Ire. christianism. Yes! take up the map of Eu- land, what it has done elsewhere, as the rope ; there lies Ireland alongside Britain, power of God unto salvation.'' and an integral part of the empire; a rock Reader, in the faith of these facts “The on which administration after administra. Congregational Union of Ireland" entered tion has split-a problem that confounds the field in 1829, and has continued till now statesmen of every creed-a perpetual clog "holding forth the word of life" to the peoon the wheels of government-a source of ple. Its operations embrace, first, its home annoyance and anxiety to the whole com- mission; and, secondly, its college. munity.

The brethren engaged as agents in the Can any thing be done for Ireland - home mission, have been publishing salva

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VOL. XXI.

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