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the New Testament with little difficulty. I am now the reader of Locaucauvy, and often speak to travellers upon religion. I was once walking on the Rajah’s Path (high road) when a man of high caste approached and said, “Is it good or evil to learn the Vadam ?' (Bible) I said, “It is good to learn.' 'How is it good ?' I answered, ' Can we easily find the way in a dark night without a light? but if a light shines on us, we may discover the place we seek. Thus our hearts by sin are in darkness; but true light is manifested by Christ in the Gospel.' He said, “ It is good ; the time will come when all people will learn the Vadam.' We then continued walking, and talking in a friendly manner on this subject. I have often spoken to Brahmins, Mahometans, and Roman Catholics, and given them books to read, which they received joyfully ; some of them saying, that hereafter they would embrace our religion. That I and all the readers may increase in love and knowledge, I entreat God to give grace! Amen."

AUTO-BIOGRAPHY OF THE NATIVE TEACHER AMOO. The following interesting narrative (written by himself) of the Native Evangelist, supported by friends at Howden, under the name of Howden Bruce, has been received from the Rev. William Beynon, of Belgaum, by whom cordial and explicit testimony is borne to the christian excellence of his character, and the growing value of his Missionary labours. I

was born at Buntwala, a village in the masters came out and inquired who I was Mangalore Collectorate, about the year and why I stood there? and if I wished to 1824. My father and mother were of the be taught with the boys? I replied, that I Jain religion, and very zealous in the per- should indeed rejoice to be taught to read formance of its rites. When I was three and write, and that I would go home and years old, my mother took me to my grand. ask my sister to allow me to go to scbool. mother, who lived at a village called Coo- They said, The master perhaps will support talum, and there I remained upwards of you. I replied that I could not eat their eleven years, occasionally visiting my pa- food and drink their water; that I was a rents. I was brought up in entire ignor- Jaio, and had never done such a thing; and ance of God--the true God-the Creator if I did, my people would put me out of of all—and taught that to worship and obey caste. The following day I told my eldest the Gooroo, (heathen priest or teacher) was sister that I wished to go to the Missionall that was necessary to make me happy. aries' school to be educated. She becamc During my residence at Cootalum, I was very angry with me, and said, No, no; that left a motherless child. But God has been will not do ; you shall not go there, for they most kind and merciful to me! better than will make you a Christian, and what will a father and mother is he, and who is like become of us then? I told her that she him?

was very much mistaken; that I was sure A few months after the death of my mo- they could never make me a Christian : why ther, my father and brother came to Coo. should I desert my religion and friends talum, in order to take me home with them. and become an outcast ? After a good Soon after returning to my father's house, deal of entreaty my sister allowed me to I went to Mangalore to visit my eldest sister, go to school. When I first arrived at the who was residing there; and, whilst living school, the boarders were taking their food. with her, my wishes led me to visit the The schoolmaster requested me to remain Bundar Bazar (landing place). Returning until the gentlemen came to examine the in the evening, I came along the road wbich school. Mr. Hebick soon after came in. leads by the house of the Rev. Mr. Hebick, He inquired who I was, and what I did in whose compound there was a school. I there. He put his hand on my head and stood near the school-room door, and was said, that he was glad that I had come to surprised to see so many boys reading and school. I was very much surprised to be writing. I felt a strong desire in my own received with so much kindness and wel. mind to be taught to read and write, but felt afraid to go into the school, hearing that it When the school was examined I heard belonged to a Padre Sahib (an English much of the state of man as a sinner; that Missionary).

he was lost and without hope ; and that he While I was standing there, some of the could only be saved through the Lord Jesus

come.

INDIA. GEORGE CHRISTIE'S NATIVE TEACHER. We have much pleasure in presenting the subjoined auto-biographical narrative of the Native Evangelist employed in connexion with our Mission at Neyoor, under the name of George CHRISTIE, and supported by the christian liberality of William Kay, Esq., Grove House, near Liverpool. Our engraving for the present month is intended to depict an event in the interesting history of George Christie, which shows, in a manner at once affecting and delightful, the stedfastness of his christian character through the abundant grace he has received, and his readiness to pour out even his life, should it be required, on the sacrifice and service of his faith. The account to which attention is now invited has been transmitted by our esteemed Missionary brother, the Rev. John Abbs.

“ When I was four years of age, my parents died, and I was nourished by my father's mother till her death. After that, I wandered from place to place, committing much wickedness and enduring many hardships. Both before and after my marriage, I walked for a long time according to my wicked thoughts and desires, and many evil devices were in my heart. After this my wife was takea ill, and I had much sorrow of mind on account of her affliction. At that time I knew not that afflictions come to us because of our sinful nature ; and, being ignorant, I gave money and food to sorcerers to recite incantations and offer sacrifice to the images of evil spirits for my wife's recovery. Although, according to the custom of the heathen, I expended much on these and such vain things the sickness of my wife diminished not, but increased ; and having been told that it would be good for me to seek an omen from a Polayen fortune-teller

, i went to him and asked his assistance. He advised me to sacrifice more fowl in order to purchase these, I took my wife's jewels from her neck and sold then but, while about to make the offering, she became worse and swooned, upes which I thought all our preparations would be useless, and I became very som

“ I wished to make my distress known to the Christian readers, but felt difficulty, because I had often reproached the Christians, their Missionaries, an' Readers, and had blasphemed the name of God. Soon after the spirit of er wife returned ; and, when she gained strength, I sent for the readers, inquires about the Gospel of Jesus Christ, heard their instructions, and united with thes in prayer.

Affliction continued and increased in my family, but Christ gave es much consolation. About two years after this, my wife died, at the age twenty-two years. Her last words were, O Jesus, suffer not my soul to lie : pain, but receive me to dwell with thee.' After her death, I soon obtaine! strength by trusting in God, and desired to know more of the christian way.

One Sunday, I was seized by some Soodras, and told to carry a burden te : feast. I said, 'I cannot carry this burden to-day, because it is my Lord's day They were very angry, beat me, and said, Who will punish us, if we kill you I replied, You cannot kill my soul ; my body only you can kill. They the bound me to a tree, (page 569,) and after beating me again, one of them se * We must know the nature of this religion : although we beat this man, he cos plains not, nor does a tear fall from his eyes. I said, • They that mourn ska hereafter be comforted.' They exclaimed, “Who is this? Is he a disciple of De vasaghayampilly ?** and immediately released me.

"I was subsequently appointed a Moopen, and baptized by Mr. Abbs, allowed me a small sum monthly for my support, and directed me to apply s mind to learning. Although I knew not a letter two years ago, I can now set.

• A Roman Catholic of this country who is reported to have suffered martyrdom many years sc. with exemplary patience.

the New Testament with little difficulty. I am now the reader of Locaucauvy, and often speak to travellers upon religion. I was once walking on the Rajah's Path (high road) when a man of high caste approached and said, “Is it good or evil to learn the Vadam ?' (Bible) I said, “It is good to learn.' ‘How is it good ?' I answered, ' Can we easily find the way in a dark night without a light ? but if a light shines on us, we may discover the place we seek. Thus our hearts by sin are in darkness; but true light is manifested by Christ in the Gospel. He said, 'It is good ; the time will coine when all people will learn the Vadam.' We then continued walking, and talking in a friendly manner on this subject. I have often spoken to Brahmins, Mahometans, and Roman Catholics, and given them books to read, which they received joyfully ; some of them saying, that hereafter they would embrace our religion. That I and all the readers may increase in love and knowledge, I entreat God to give grace! Amen,”

AUTO-BIOGRAPHY OF THE NATIVE TEACHER AMOO. The following interesting narrative (written by himself) of the Native Evangelist, supported by friends at Howden, under the name of Howden BRUCE, has been received from the Rev. William Beynon, of Belgaum, by whom cordial and explicit testimony is borne to the christian excellence of his character, and the growing value of his Missionary labours.

I was born at Buntwala, a village in the masters came out and inquired who I was Mangalore Collectorate, about the year and why I stood there? and if I wished to 1824. My father and mother were of thie be taught with the boys? I replied, that I Jain religion, and very zealous in the per- should indeed rejoice to be taught to read formance of its rites. When I was three and write, and that I would go home and years old, my mother took me to my grand- ask my sister to allow me to go to scbool. mother, who lived at a village called Coo. They said, The master perhaps will support talum, and there I remained upwards of you. I replied that I could not eat their eleven years, occasionally visiting my pa

food and drink their water; that I was a rents. I was brought up in entire ignor- Jain, and had never done such a thing; and ance of God- the true God—the Creator if I did, my people would put me out of of all and taught that to worship and obey caste. The following day I told my eldest the Gooroo, (heathen priest or teacher) was sister that I wished to go to the Missionall that was necessary to make me happy. aries' school to be educated. She became During my residence at Cootalum, I was very angry with me, and said, No, no; that left a motherless child. But God has been will not do; you shall not go there, for they most kind and merciful to me! better than will make you a Christian, and what will a father and mother is he, and who is like become of us then? I told her that she him?

was very much mistaken; that A few months after the death of my mo- they could never make me a Christian : why ther, my father and brother came to Coo. should I desert my religion and friends talum, in order to take me home with them. and become an outcast ? After a good Soon after returning to my father's house, deal of entreaty my sister allowed me to I went to Mangalore to visit my eldest sister, go to school. When I first arrived at the who was residing there; and, whilst living school, the boarders were taking their food. with her, my wishes led me to visit the The schoolmaster requested me to remain Bundar Bazar (landing place). Returning until the gentlemen came to examine the in the evening, I came along the road wbich school. Mr. Hebick soon after came in. leads by the house of the Rev. Mr. Hebick, He inquired who I was, and what I did in whose compound there was a school. I there. He put his hand on my head and stood near the school-room door, and was said, that he was glad that I had come to surprised to see so many boys reading and school. I was very much surprised to be writing. I felt a strong desire in my own received with so much kindness and wel. mind to be taught to read and write, but felt afraid to go into the school, hearing that it When the school was examined I heard belonged to a Padre Sahib (an English much of the state of man as a sinner; that Missionary).

he was lost and without hope; and that he While I was standing there, some of the could only be saved through the Lord Jesus

was sure

come.

get them.

Christ. The sin and guilt of idolatry were by her husband. All this pierced my heart. shown, and I also beard that there was no It was to me a sudden and severe trial at hope of salvation to any who trusted in the time; yet the Lord, my Saviour and images. Turning to me, the gentleman strength, had pity upon me, a poor weak said, My dear boy, you are a sinner; you boy. The words of the Lord Jesus, redo not know the true God, and Jesus Christ corded in Matt. v. 11, 12, gave me great his Son whom he sent into the world to save comfort, and strengthened me; and so they sinners. He spoke a good deal of the love have many times since-I shall never forand favour of God. After hearing all, I do not know what I felt. My heart melted When my relations saw that their efforts within me. I immediately determined to to induce me to return to them were use. stay in the school to know and hear more less, they pronounced a curse upon me and of this Saviour, and to learn that which con. left me to myself. My caste people tried to cerned the salvatiou of my soul.

force me back by making outcasts of my But I was little aware of the difficulties family. This they did for fourteen days ; and opposition with which I should have to but, finding the plan ineffectual, they recontend. As soon as my determination stored them ; charging them, at the same was known, my relatives and friends, and time, that if they held any intercourse with a great number of Jains, my caste people, me, they should immediately be put out of said that I had become a Cbristian. I told caste. From the time I was deserted by them how I felt, and what my wishes were. my family and friends, the Lord God, my I was frightened, and prayed to God to help Saviour, has been my guide. me. There was a great uproar.

Some In November 1839, I left Mangalore for threw dust in the air ; others cursed me and Dharwar. Hearing that there were Mis. the Missionaries in the name of their gods, sionaries at Belgaum, I went thither, and and tried to force me away; but I would was introduced to them by the teacher Sonot go. They watched me; and soon after, lomon, who acted most kindly towards me. when they saw me standing near the school. Soon afterwards, Mr. Beynon took me room door, they rushed upon me, caught under his protection and care, and taught hold of my hands, and severely flogged me. me more fully the word of God. I was bap. Some said, Such a fellow should not live tized by him in the Shapore chapel, on the any longer; he must be put to death. 1st of January, 1842. I continue to study Among them were my eldest sister, and my under him. To God be all the praise for old grandmother, whose conduct deeply what he has done for me! My trust is in affected me. The latter said that I ought that blessed Saviour who gave his life for to be cut into four quarters and hung at the

I wish to make known his salvation four corners of the earth. My dear sister, to my own countrymen, that they may when she saw my mind was fixed, wept bit. know the true God, and Jesus Christ whom terly, and fell down senseless to the ground. he has sent. When she recovered she was taken home

me.

SALEM. Tue facts stated in the appended extracts of a Missionary Journal, transmitted by the Rev. J. M. Lechler, exhibit, in a very affecting manner, the ignorant and degraded state of the native population in this part of India, the influence of ancient superstitious customs over their minds, the spirit of inquiry which is beginning to arouse them from their intellectual lethargy and thraldom, and the necessity for employing additional means to spread amongst them the principles of true knowledge, and guide their feet into the way of peace.

Jan. 25, 1813.-Speaking with some hea- evening, said he wished very much to have then men of the custom of burning their the book from which I was reading. (It dead, I asked them what they thought be. was the New Testament belonging to my comes of the soul when the body dies and servant, as I had already given mine away.) is burnt ? One of them replied, “When He had hardly finished asking, when anc. the body is burnt, the soul is burnt too." ther one said he wished to have it too. I I said, that I did not think so; for the told the latter that I would send him one soul being a spirit, it was impossible to from Salem ; but seeing one lying near my burn it. I then enlarged on the subject, box, belonging to one of the assistants, lie reading to them the passages which bear on would not cease till we gave it to him. It this point. They all seemed to be much was rather old, but he preferred it to wait. delighted, and one of them, the school. ing for a new one. At morning prayers master, who had been sneering the previous we had two intelligent heathen from a neighbouring village with us, who heard very attentively, 1 Cor. xv., which we were reading. Both asked for the New Testament from which we had been reading; but, as this was the only one that remained, we gave them a copy of the Psalms, and a part of the Old Testament.

This afternoon, while reading Dr. Philip's “ Researches in South Africa," a family of Brahmins came near my place. The women wasbed their clothes in a small tank, and dried them ; and, in the meantime, two little boys, with two young men and their father, assembled under a green tree opposite the Choultry. Whilst the men sat and talked with one another, the boys made themselves very busy in oiling the idols which stood under the tree, pouring water over them, and decorating them with flowers. I went near, and asked the old Brahmin why the boys were doing so. He replied, “We are doing homage to the

Swamy;* I know it is madness, but such is the custom of the country : what is to be done?" I said, “Is this the Swamy? I see nothing but stones.' “ Yes," an. swered one of the young men,

" this is the Lord- the God who created and preserved us." I then tried to show them that God is a Spirit, and that he cannot be

resented by a stone, or any other substance ; but while I was talking, the old man got up, laid a few plantains before the idol, and broke some cocoa-nuts, the milk of which he poured out before the senseless stone. Lights were also kindled, and incense burnt. After making a few more re. marks on the sin and foolishness of this idol-worship, I prepared to go on my journey. The old Brahmin, seeing this, took up a few plantains, and cocoa-nut shells, and presented them to me; but I refused taking them, saying that I would not eat any thing that had been offered to idols.

NATIVE FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL AT MADRAS. Few objects connected with the Missionary work in India present an aspect of greater interest and importance than the Native Female Orphan and Boarding Schools, several of which are now in promising operation. In addition to the accounts recently published of the progress of these excellent Institutions, we have now the pleasure to present a brief but gratifying report, lately received, of the Native Female Boarding School, under the superintendence of Mrs. W. Porter, at Madras.

This school is superintended by Mrs.Wil- a country so demoralizing, we have learned liam Porter. The number of children has to rejoice with trembling : our hopes may considerably increased since last year, and, be blighted, but we commit our youthful in consequence of this, we have been com- charge to his care, who will not break pelled to enlarge our premises. Nearly the bruised reed, or quench the smoking fifty children, separated as much as possible flax. from heathen associations, are boarded, We have been greatly encouraged in this clothed, and educated. Their education is sphere of labour by the kindness of friends chiefly in the vernacular language ; but in England and India. We are helped they are taught English to a great tent, both by their contributions and their and always examined in what they have prayers. One kind friend, writing from learned, through the medium of their own England as the representative of many language. Large portions of Scripture, in more, and sending contributions for the Tamil and English, have been committed support of eight children, asks for the to memory; also, Dr. Watts's First and

name, disposition, and general character of Second Catechisms, in Tamil and English ; each of the children, that she and they may and Watts's Divine Songs, and Ilistorical “individualize tbem at a throne of grace.' Catechism, in English. Tamil grammar This is the kind of interest we wish our and geography have been attended to by friends to manifest. We are confident as some of the elder scholars.

to its result. Let our friends, with their The progress of the children, in divine contributions, give us their special, earnest, and human knowledge, is very encouraging, and continued prayers, and we feel sure that nor is this all-there have been some pleas. a blessing cannot long be withheld. “God ing manifestations of religious feeling which will bless us ;' for, though the soil be suffice to show that our labour is not alto. barren in which the seed of truth is cast, gether “in vain in the Lord.” It would and there is no human probability that be interesting to speak of these more at it will ever germinate and grow, we canlength; but with children so young, and in not forget the promise of a faithful God.

• A name applied to God, or any being thought to be of a superior order.

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