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heavy bullet. It requires considerable powder to push it. It is a mighty battle field where all the vim of enthusiasm may well find room for profitable action. If the three thousand officers, or more, would practice shooting this big bullet of improvement, the energy gathered in such effort would aid them later in life in achieving success in other ways.

Orison Swett Marden, the author of several excellent works on success, talks pointedly to young men on this subject of vim, and energy. His words are very appropriate for our work:

“Nothing else, excepting honesty, is so much in demand in these days as 'vim.' Everybody believes in it; everywhere we hear; 'Give us a man who can do something; a man who has push; a man with some iron in his blood.' Ability is worthless without the power to put it into action. Resolutions, however good, are useless without the energy necessary to carry them out. Push clears the track; people get out of the way of an energetic man. Even small ability with great energy will accomplish more than the greatest ability without energy. If fired from a gun with sufficient velocity, a tallow candle can be shot through an inch board.

“On every hand, we see fine young men and women failing, their ability going to waste, standing in equilibrium, for the lack of 'force.' If we could only shake them up, put a little powder into them, and set them going, they might amount to something, but without this they are failures. They seem to have every other quality except the power of pushing their way in the world, without which almost all their ability is wasted. The finest engine ever made would be absolutely useless without power to propel it, and drag the load to its destination.

“The world admires energetic men. Blow them this way and that, and they only bend; they never break. Put obstacles in their way, and they surmount them. It is almost impossible to keep such men down. Trip one up, and instantly he is on his feet again; bury him in the mud, and almost instantly he is up and at it again. Such men as he build cities, establish schools and hospitals, whiten the ocean with sails, and blacken the air with the smoke of their industry.

“The pathway of life is strewn with wrecks of those who have failed because they lacked this propelling power. The moment they strike an obstacle, they stop; they have no power to climb or overcome. The genius of achievement seems to have been left out of their make-up; their blood lacks the iron of energy, the force of accomplishment."

EVENTS OF THE MONTH.

BY THOMAS HULL, SECRETARY OF THE GENERAL BOARD OF Y. M. M. I. A.

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January 20th, 1900: Horace S. Ensign was installed as leader of the Tabernacle Choir in the absence of Evan Stephens in Europe and the east.

The proposition to borrow $20,000 to keep the Salt Lake City schools open to the close of the school year, was voted down, at an election, by a vote of 1,410 against, and 350 for. Captain J. F. Mills was acquitted of the killing of J. C. O'Melveney. The jury agreed in six minutes after reaching its room. D. C. Dunbar was chosen president and J. H. Parry secretary of the Anti-Vaccination League.

The seventh annual meeting of the Utah Press Association met in Salt Lake City. M. F. Murray of Ephraim, was chosen president.

The attack for the relief of Ladysmith was begun by Gen. Warren under General Buller.

21st: The Jordan Stake of Zion, with about 7,000 members, was completely organized: 0. P. Miller, stake president, Hyrum Goff, James Jensen, counselors; Elisha Brown, stake superintendent Young Men's Mutual Improvement Associations, and Solomon E. Smith and James B. Jensen, counselors.

23d: Congressman B. H. Roberts makes a strong plea in his own behalf and his case is thoroughly discussed in the House. The movement for the relief of Ladysmith is suddenly stopped,

24th: Commissioner Evans sent a statement to the Senate showing the number of pensioners on the rolls on account of the wars of the United States:

"On account of the Revolutionary war, four widows and seven daughters.

“War of 1812, one survivor, 1,998 widows.
"Indian wars, 1832 to 1842, 1,656 survivors and 3,889 widows.
"Mexican war, 9,204 survivors and 8,175 widows.

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"Granted since 1861 under general law, 331,555 invalids, and 92,901 widows and other dependents; under law of 1890, invalids, 420,912; widows and dependents, 130,224.”

25th: By a vote of 268 to 50, Congressman B. H. Roberts of Utah, was excluded from the House of Representatives and the seat from Utah declared vacant.

It is reported that General Warren has captured Spionkop with heavy losses.

27th: An order of the western railroads effective Feb. 1, abolishes all commissions paid to local ticket agents. The roads will save millions, and the agents will lose.

The Granite Stake of Zion, Salt Lake County, was organized: Frank Y. Taylor, president and James R. Miller and Edwin Bennion counselors; stake superintendent Young Men's Mutual Improvement Associations, William C. Winder, with Uriah Miller and Joseph Musser, counselors.

The Salt Lake City schools were closed, pending an appeal to the Supreme Court of a decision of Judge Cherry ordering the issuance of a writ of mandamus compelling the Board to admit unvaccinated children. Captain J. F. Mills forgave his wife, who with her husband and two children left for San Francisco.

Governor Wells issued a proclamation calling a special election to be held on Monday, 2nd day of April, to elect a successor to Hon. B. H. Roberts.

28th: At the Battle of Spionkop on the 25th, the British, instead of gaining a victory, sustained a loss of 1,500 soldiers from Gen. Warren's force. The London Times says that the catastrophe is perhaps “without a parallel except in the surrender of Yorktown." Gen. Buller's army is withdrawing south of the Tugela. 30th: The small pox quarantine in Ogden is completely lifted.

William Goebel, the Democratic contestant for Governor of Kentucky, who was declared Governor by the Kentucky Contest Board, was shot by an assassin. Harland Whittaker, a farmer from Butler County, the home of Governor Taylor, is in jail charged with the crime.

Geo. B. Wallace, pioneer of 1847, and once President of the Salt Lake Stake, died at Granger. The January mining dividend of Utah amounted to $254,900.

31st: It is announced that England suffered a loss of 2,000 at Spionkop and with General Buller's operations north of the Tugela. The battle at Spionkop was the most furious conflict in British military history.

Governor Goebel takes the oath of office as Governor of Kentucky; and Governor Taylor proclaims Kentucky in a state of insurrection and adjourns the legislature to meet in London, Ky.

February 1st: The Board of Health decides that Salt Lake schools

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may safely open.

The strength of the British Army in South Africa is 145,700.

Mrs. Catherine Salisbury, sister of the Prophet Joseph Smith, born at Lebanon, N. H., 1812, died at her home in Fountain Green, Illinois.

3rd: Hon. B. H. Robert arrived on the afternoon train from Washington.

William Goebel, Kentucky's wounded Democratic Governor, dies from the effects of his wounds at 6:45 p. m.

4th: A fire visited St. Louis, destroying property valued at $1,500,000.

General Buller re-crosses the Tugela and is marching on Ladysmith.

5th: Hon. B. H. Roberts, by his attorney, pleads not guilty to a charge of unlawful cohabitation.

The bodies of Harry A. and John G. Young and Charles Parsons arrived from Manila.

T. R. Cutler and others purchase one-fourth interest in Bear River Canal from David Evans, who formerly held a half interest.

6th: The Salt Lake Valley Railway Company filed articles of incorporation to build an electric railway between Salt Lake City and Ogden.

The text of the treaty was made known between the United States and Great Britain to facilitate the building of the Isthmian Canal and to remove any objections in the ClaytonBulwer treaty of 1850.

William H. Taft of Ohio, was named by President McKinley as President of the new Philippine Commission.

9th: The third attempt of General Buller to relieve Ladysmith ends in defeat

Major-General Henry W. Lawton was buried today in the National Cemetery, Arlington, Washington D.C.

11th: Impressive services in memory of the Utah heroes of Manila: Dr. Harry A. Young, Corp. John G. Young, W. I. Goodman and Charles Parsons, were held in the Salt Lake Tabernacle. Speeches of tribute were made by Governor Wells, Judge Le Grand Young, Elders Jos. E. Taylor, S. W. Stewart, Dr. Joseph T. Kingsbury, and Dr. James E. Talmage. Beautiful music and exquisite floral decorations were offered. The bodies afterward lay in state in the City and County building.

12th: Salt Lake sectarian ministers issue a statement supporting a proposed amendment to the Constitution prohibiting polygamy.

13th: With appropriate ceremonies the bodies of Dr. Harry A. Young, Sergt. Ford Fisher, Corp. John G. Young and Privates W. I. Goodman and Charles Parsons, five members of Utah's famous artillery who met death in the Philippines, were buried with full military honors, Sergt. Ford Fisher's body being interred at Mt. Olivet and the others in the Salt Lake City cemetery.

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14th: W. J. Bateman succeeds N. W. Clayton as manager of the Salt Lake and Los Angeles Company

Charles E. Macrum former Consul at Pretoria gives a statement of his reasons for leaving his post. It was to rightly inform the Government of existing conditions, and because his mail had been tampered with by the English censor.

General Roberts enters the Orange Free State with an army of nearly 50,000 men, and the British for the first time since the war began are inside the Boer frontier.

15th: Secretary Joseph Chamberlain announced in the House of Commons that if the native Zulu territory was invaded by the Boers, the natives "will be encouraged and assisted in every way in defending themselves.” Such action would be a terrible calamity, and would mean a savage warfare that would turn South Africa into a hell on earth.

16th: Kimberley is relieved by General French, and General Cronje's forces are retreating. In their hasty departure the Boers lost large supplies and much ammunition.

17th: The House Committee on Election submitted a joint resolution providing that neither polygamy nor polygamous association

shall exist or be lawful in the United States nor in any place within its jurisdiction General Buller renewed fighting on

the Tugela. The Boers are retiring.

19th: General Buller has broken the Boer line of fortresses and captured the Burghers' position at Monte Christo. The campaign of General Roberts is proving successful

The case of John H. Benbroke, charged with the murder of Burton C. Morris, taken up in Judge Hiles' court.

20th: It is announced that the Deseret Telegraph Company's lines have been purchased by the Western Union Mackintosh, a widely known mining man and capitalist died in Salt Lake City

The Boers are leaving all positions held by them on British territory and are concentrating for the defense of

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