Representations of Death in Nineteenth-century US Writing and Culture

Portada
Lucy Elizabeth Frank
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2007 M01 1 - 234 páginas
From the famous deathbed scene of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Little Eva to Mark Twain's parodically morbid poetess Emmeline Grangerford, a preoccupation with human finitude informs the texture of nineteenth-century US writing. This collection traces the vicissitudes of this cultural preoccupation with the subject of death and examines how mortality served paradoxically as a site on which identity and subjectivity were productively rethought. Contributors from North America and the United Kingdom, representing the fields of literature, theatre history, and American studies, analyze the sexual, social, and epistemological boundaries implicit in nineteenth-century America's obsession with death, while also seeking to give a voice to the strategies by which these boundaries were interrogated and displaced. Topics include race- and gender-based investigations into the textual representation of death,
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

IV
1
V
13
VI
15
VII
29
VIII
43
IX
61
X
77
XII
89
XV
125
XVI
141
XVII
155
XVIII
157
XIX
173
XX
189
XXI
205
XXII
217

XIII
107
XIV
109

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (2007)

Lucy Frank is the author of five novels for young people: "Just Ask Iris; Oy, Joy!; Will You Be My Brussels Sprout?; I Am an Artichoke;" and "The Annoyance Bureau."
She splits her time between New York City and upstate New York, where she and her husband have raised one son, three cats, and four ducks. Read more about Lucy and her books at www.lucyfrank.com.

Información bibliográfica