England: An Account of Past and Contemporary Conditions and Progress

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John Manley Hall
Bay View reading club, 1906 - 151 páginas

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Página 103 - They look up with their pale and sunken faces, And their look is dread to see, For they 'mind you of their angels in high places, With eyes turned on Deity. "How long...
Página 103 - THE CRY OF THE CHILDREN Do ye hear the children weeping, O my brothers, Ere the sorrow comes with years? They are leaning their young heads against their mothers, And that cannot stop their tears. The young lambs are bleating in the meadows, The young birds are chirping in the nest, The young fawns are playing with the shadows, The young flowers are blowing toward the west — But the young, young children, O my brothers, They are weeping bitterly! They are weeping in the playtime of the others,...
Página 100 - ... to demonstrate, that the most effectual plan for advancing a people to greatness, is to maintain that order of things which nature has pointed out ; by allowing every man, as long as he observes the rules of justice, to pursue his own interest in his own way, and to bring both his industry and his capital into the freest competition with those of his fellow-citizens.
Página 103 - THE CRY OF THE CHILDREN. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Do ye hear the children weeping, 0 my brothers, Ere the sorrow comes with years ? They are leaning their young heads against their mothers, — And that cannot stop their tears. The young lambs are bleating in the meadows : The young birds are chirping in the nest; The young fawns are playing with the shadows ; The young flowers are blowing toward the west — But the young, young children, 0 my brothers, They are weeping bitterly ! — They are...
Página 67 - And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them? King or queen. All this I promise to do.
Página 37 - Your beloved country has received a place among the fair Churches which, normally constituted, form the splendid aggregate of Catholic Communion : Catholic England has been restored to its orbit in the ecclesiastical firmament, from which its light had long vanished, and begins now anew its course of regularly adjusted action round the centre of unity, the source of jurisdiction, of light and of vigour.
Página 70 - To state the matter shortly, the sovereign has, under a constitutional monarchy such as ours, three rights — the right to be consulted, the right to encourage, the right to warn. And a king of great sense and sagacity would want no others.
Página 88 - ... storm ; some did their best to raise it. All that was what Lord Spencer had to deal with ; the very foundations of the social fabric rocking.' The new viceroy attacked the formidable task before him with resolution, minute assiduity, and an inexhaustible store of that steady-eyed patience which is the sovereign requisite of any man who, whether with coercion or without, takes in hand the government of Ireland.
Página 33 - I found my first Ragged School, in an obscure place called West Street, Saffron Hill, pitifully struggling for life, under every disadvantage. It had no means, it had no suitable rooms, it derived no power or protection from being recognised by any authority, it attracted within its...
Página 38 - I would never have consented to anything which breathed a spirit of intolerance. Sincerely Protestant as I always have been, and always shall be, and indignant as I am at those who call themselves Protestants while they are in fact quite the contrary, I much regret the unchristian and intolerant spirit exhibited by many people at the public meetings.

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