A Confession and Other Religious Writings

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Penguin Books Limited, 1987 M08 27 - 238 páginas
Describing Tolstoy’s crisis of depression and estrangement from the world, A Confession (1879) is an autobiographical work of exceptional emotional honesty. By the time he was fifty, Tolstoy had already written the novels that would assure him of literary immortality; he had a wife, a large estate and numerous children; he was ‘a happy man’ and in good health - yet life had lost its meaning. In this poignant confessional fragment, he records a period of his life when he began to turn away from fiction and aesthetics, and to search instead for ‘a practical religion not promising future bliss, but giving bliss on earth’.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - mporterf - LibraryThing

It is amazing some of the observations Tolstoy makes in this book. Reminiscent of Solomon in Ecclesiastes, re: vanity of vanities... excellent thought- and discussion-provoker. Leer comentario completo

Review: A Confession and Other Religious Writings

Crítica de los usuarios  - Peter Frazier - Goodreads

A good book for the dark days of winter. I read this together with Bertrand Russel's book on happiness, "The Conquest of Happiness". The two books have a lot in common. Leer comentario completo

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Acerca del autor (1987)

Count Leo Tolstoy was born on September 9, 1828, in Yasnaya Polyana, Russia. Orphaned at nine, he was brought up by an elderly aunt and educated by French tutors until he matriculated at Kazan University in 1844. In 1847, he gave up his studies and, after several aimless years, volunteered for military duty in the army, serving as a junior officer in the Crimean War before retiring in 1857. In 1862, Tolstoy married Sophie Behrs, a marriage that was to become, for him, bitterly unhappy. His diary, started in 1847, was used for self-study and self-criticism; it served as the source from which he drew much of the material that appeared not only in his great novels War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina(1877), but also in his shorter works. Seeking religious justification for his life, Tolstoy evolved a new Christianity based upon his own interpretation of the Gospels. Yasnaya Polyana became a mecca for his many converts. At the age of eighty-two, while away from home, the writer suffered a break down in his health in Astapovo, Riazan, and he died there on November 20, 1910.

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