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->] - orio it began to be very sensible that the Spirit of s d after this time Satan seemed to ul mannel ETrst- m

—2 a family that are exceeding prone to the disease of melancholy, and his moths Was TRIIIed with it. TT beginning of This extraordinary time,

- aux - T been exceedingly concerned about the state of his soul, and there were some hings in his experso; Ty HOTETTIy, but he durst entertain no

hope concerning his own good estate. Towards the latter part of HISTIME,TE

grew much discouraged, and melancholy grew amain upon him, till he was

wholly overpowered by it, and was, in great measur ity of receiving # 3, or being reasoned with to any purpose: the devil took the advanfo-roo

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about anything spiritual or temporal, yet had it urged upon them, as if some

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astic delusions: one at Suffield, and another at South - - To the greatest noiseTTTTCCountry was of the Tom adley|whose delusion was, that he thought himself divinely instructed to direct a poor man in melancholy and despairing circumstances, to sa certain words in prayer to God, as recorded in Psal. cxvi. 4, for his own relief The man is esteemed a pious man: I have, since this error of his, had a parts:

ular acquaintance with him, and, I believe, none would hat J Tsūgh an acquaintance.TTTe gave me a particular account of the manner how he was desuded, which is ut, in

short, he was exceedingly rejoice. - is extraordinary work, so carried on in this part of the country, and was possessed with an opin.

o s| ion that it was the beginning of the glorious times of the church spoken of in

y Scripture: and had read it as the opinion of some divines, that there would be

many in these times that should be - e Holy
THIRT morac otion; though he had at first no apprehensions
i.Sooooooo-oo: he since exceedingly
Iamen Shonor he has done to God, and the wound he has given re-
ligion in it, and has lain low before God and man for it.
After these things the instances of conversion were rare here in comparison

of what they had before been (though that remarkable instance of the little -> was after this); and the Spirit of God after that time appeared very sen

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sibly withdrawing from all parts of the country (though we have heard of its going on in some places of Connecticut, and that it continues to be carried on. even to this day). But *::::Holo. and, I believe in some other places, the main subject of conversation for several months after this. And there were so urns, wherein ** *** mething to revive, and we were ready talope Inasal ooing to be renewed again; yet in the main

there was a gradual decline of Qat general engaged, lively spirit in religion,
which had troon before. Severa **śH. divert-
ed people's minds, and turned their conversation more to other affairs, as parti-
cularly his Excellêncy the Governor's coming up, and the Committee of the
ourt, on the treaty with the Indians; and afterwards the Springfie
controversy, and since that, our people in this town have been engaged in the
**** other occurrences might be men-
tioned, that have seemed to have this effect.
But as to those that law ght to be converted
ignotoy generally seem to be persons that have - ge
wrou : Thave had particular acquaintance with many of them
since, and they generally appear to be persons that hav --
- - - ivine attributes, and Jesus

and they Iem in a new manner; though it is very far from being always alike with them, neither can they revive-a-sense of things when they reas: elt earts are often Togo, and eaetimes—filled with new Featnesses and delights; there seems to be an inward ardor and burning of heart that they ex offlo occoisoned only by the mention of Christ's name, or some one of the divine perfections: there are new appetites, and a new kind of breathings and pantings o greasino e uttereosTThere TSTInew Kind of inward labor and struggle of soul towards heaven and holiness. Loome that before were very rough eir temper and manners seem to be remarkably softened and sweetenelo And some have had their souls exceed

ingly filled and overwhelmed with light, love, and comfort, long since 2. And

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of God has ceased to be so remarkably carried on in a general way; and 26me
have had much greater experiences of this nature than they had befor
there is still a great deal of religious conversation continued in the town,
amongst yourg and old;...a religious disposition appears to be still maintai
- eir upholding frequentTITVâteresgous
altsorts are generally worshipping God at such meetings, on Soath nights, and
in the # ăTCIGI public Tecture. TMany childreo -
keep up such meetings among themselves. I know of no one young person in
the town that has returned to former ways of looseness and extravagancy in
any respect, but we still remain a reformed people, and -
made us a ne *_ - - - -
ay there has been no instance of any one person that has carried
himself so, that others should j umbled concerning his profession; nor Z
an I so vain - -

taken concerning any that weh ñtertained a good opinion of, or that there are none that pass amo

us for sheep, That are indeeswoly eep's clothing, who probably may some ti Other, discover themselves by their fruits. We are not so pure

but that we have great cause to be humbled and ashamed, that we are so in

e; nor so religious but that those that watch for our halting may see:
sanctifica \\

in us, whence they may take occasion to reproach us and religion; main there has been a great and marvellous work of conversion

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272 NARRATIVE OF SURPRISING CONVERSIONS.

tion among the people here, and they have paid all due respects to those who

ave .#o.; Both old and young have own a forwardness to hearket. Tonly to Iy counsels, but Even to my re. roofs from the pulpit. - --A great part of the country have not received the most favorable thoughts of this affair, and to this day many retain a jealousy concerning it, and prejudice againstit; I have reason to think that the meanness and weakness of theinstrument, that has been made use of in this town, has prejudiced many against it; it does not appear to me strange that it should be so: but yet the circumstance of this great work of God is analogous to other circumstances of it; God has so ordered the manner of the work in many respects, as very signally #o:#; #To to his own almighty Dower and sovereign grace. And whatever the circumstances and means have been, and #####So unworthy, yet so hath it pleased God to work! And we are evidently a propleblosed of the Lord! And here in this- shorolo o anifests his glory. 27--es us, rend Sir, shave given a large and particular account of this remarkable affair, and yet considering how manifold God's works have been amongst us, that are worthy to be written, it is but a very brief one. I should have sent it much sooner, had I not been greatly hindered by illness in my #o; It is probabl ChTarger than you expected, and it may be than you would have chosen. WIthought that the extraordinariness of the thing, and the innumerable misrepresentations which have gone abroad of it, many of which have, doubtless, reached your ears, made it necessary that I should be particular. But I would leave it entirely with your wisdom to make what use of it you think best, to send a part of it to England, or all, or none, if you think it not worthy; or otherwise to dispose of it as you may - think most for God's glory, and the interest of religion. H you are pleased to send anything to the Rev. Dr. Guyse, I should be glad to have it signified to him, as my humble desire, that since he, and the congregation to which he preached, have been pleased to take so much notice of us, as they have, that they would also think of us at the Throne of Grace, and seek there for us that God would not forsake us, but enable us to bring forth fruit answerable to our

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took of God's mercies to us, I took occasion to inform our congregation of it in

-7 a discourse from these words: A city that is set upon a hill cannot be hid. And / having since seen a particular account of the notice of the Reverend Dr. Guyse, and the congregation he preached to, took of it, in a letter you wrote to my

'7 honored uncle Williams, I read that part of your letter to the congregation, and

I humbly request of you, Reverend Sir, your prayers for this country, in its §o.o. it is brought by the Springfield qāīreh-wfisch, doubtless, above all things that have happened, has tended Tołoś. and to prejudice this country againstit, and himses the propagation of it. Talso ask your prayers for this town, and would particularly began interest in them for him who is, Honored Sir, with humble respect, Your obedient son and servant,

JONATHAN EDWARDS. | NorthAMPtoN, Nov. 6, 1736.

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| 7 40.

Voi... III. 35

A DW ERT IS EMENT.

The occasion of the following treatise, will be seen, in part, in the preceding nar. . . Tracious influences ICTIoly spirit with Womson Mormompromwig's,

abundantly enriched, and which spread through many towns in its vicinity, were soon followed with a very extensive revival over the land. . An extraordinary zeal was excited in Tăny-FossGTTTTTTEFETI ăVelled the country and preached

daily. They addressed their crowded audi tes, not in the dull o of a #. moral lecture, but in the demonstration of the Spirit; and with power. heir inde########"...i...— ... put on her robes of salvation. Converts to Jesus were multiplied as the drops of the morning dew. Religion became almost the only subject of concern. Many indulged the o that to-uillennia ing. This glorious work had its opposers.TAdvas: toge wors faken of the errors of some of its most zealous promoters to cry it down, and render it altogether suspicious. Mr. Edwards' design was to vindicate it, as undoubtedly a work of God, and among the most admirable of his triumphs over the hearts of his enemies; to correct errors which attended it, and to excite augmented efforts for its incoaase. = . The scene which he describes is past. Let it live however in our memories. Let it excite our fervent gratitude, and call forth the devout aspirations of our souls for the spread of the victories of our glorious King in these days. Let the pertinent and instructive sentiments wrought into the treatise, the most of which are adapted to every condition in which the church and the individual believer can be placed, take deep hold of our hearts and be carried out in their proper effects in our lives. This work had a second edition in Scotland, soon after it was first published in t!, is country.

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