Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine, Volumen2

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Douglas Jerrold
Punch Office, 1845
Contains Douglas Jerrold's novel St. Giles and St. James (selected issues, no. 1-29), illustrated by Leech.

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Página 251 - And busily gan for the soules pray Of them that gave him <25> wherewith to scholay* Of study took he moste care and heed. Not one word spake he more than was need; And that was said in form and reverence, And short and quick, and full of high sentence. Sounding in moral virtue was his speech, And gladly would he learn, and gladly teach.
Página 517 - History maketh a young man to be old without either wrinkles or gray hairs; privileging him with the experience of age, without either the infirmities or inconveniences thereof.
Página 455 - I counted the perspiratory pores on the palm of the hand, and found 3,528 in a square inch. Now, each of these pores being the aperture of a little tube of about a quarter of an inch long, it follows that in a square inch of skin on the palm of the hand, there exists a length of tube equal to 882 inches, or 73£ feet.
Página 445 - Yea, it not only maketh things past, present; but enableth one to make a rational conjecture of things to come. For this world affordeth no new accidents, but in the same sense wherein we call it a new moon, which is the old one in another shape, and yet no other than what hath been formerly. Old actions return again, furbished over with some new and different circumstances.
Página 80 - All these cities were connected with each other, and with the capital, by the public highways, which issuing from the Forum of Rome, traversed Italy, pervaded the provinces, and were terminated only by the frontiers of the empire.
Página 80 - The public roads were accurately divided by milestones, and ran in a direct line from one city to another, with very little respect for the obstacles either of nature or private property. Mountains were perforated, and bold arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams.
Página 302 - A garden is a beautiful book, writ by the finger of God ; every flower and every leaf is a letter. You have only to learn them — and he is a poor dunce that cannot, if he will, do that — to learn them and join them, and then to go on reading and reading, and you will find yourself carried away from the earth to the skies by the beautiful story you are going through.
Página 257 - Ye call Me Master, and Lord ; and ye say well, for so I am. If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet, ye ought also to wash one another's feet ; for I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you.
Página 115 - Genius of all noble deeds and honourable renown: a gentle Spirit, holding her fair state for their reward and recognition (do not be alarmed, my Lord Chamberlain; this is only in a picture) ; and say what young and ardent heart may not find one to beat in unison with it — beat high with generous aspiration like its own — in following their onward course, as it is traced by this great pencil! Is it the Love of Woman, in its truth and deep devotion, that inspires you? See it here! Is it glory,...
Página 60 - ought loyally to keep the faith that we promised to thy brother, Duke Robert ; he has received our oath of homage ; and, absent or present, he has the right.

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