The Classical Journal, Volumen6

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Página 176 - The young men saw me, and hid themselves : and the aged arose, and stood up.
Página 382 - And in process of time it came to pass, that Cain brought of the fruit of the ground an offering unto the LORD. And Abel, he also brought of the firstlings of his flock and of the fat thereof.
Página 381 - And unto Adam he said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life...
Página 379 - This is the book of the generations of Adam. In the day that God created man, in the likeness of God made he him ; male and female created he them ; and blessed them, and called their name Adam, in the day when they were created.
Página 380 - And Adam lived an hundred and thirty years, and begat a son in his own likeness, after his image; and called his name Seth...
Página 91 - The thing to be lamented is, not that men have so great regard to their own good or interest in the present world, for they have not enough ; but that they have so little to the good of others.
Página 315 - But I have a few things against thee, because thou hast there them that hold the doctrine of Balaam, who taught Balak to cast a stumbling-block before the children of Israel, to eat things sacrificed unto idols, and to commit fornication.
Página 177 - Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us.
Página 241 - And that which casts our proficiency therein so much behind is our time lost partly in too oft idle vacancies given both to schools and universities; partly in a preposterous exaction, forcing the empty wits of children to compose themes, verses, and orations, which are the acts of ripest judgment and the final work of a head filled by long reading and observing with elegant maxims and copious invention.
Página 368 - ... no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...

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