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Our new Volume, commencing on the first of July, contained an

ENTIRELY NEW FEATURE. The brilliant literary newspapers of Paris have, for some time, owed their chief interest to brie novels, written by the leading men of genius, and, which, in a few chapters extending through on or two numbers of a paper, give the condensed interest and thought which was formerly sprea over several volumes. This class of productions is, we think, the most exciting and glowin feature of the literature of our day. They are written, however, with that beanty of style whic embodies so much of the attraction of modern French literature, and are, of course, entirely lo or misrepresented in a careless or poor translation. Anxious to insure to our readers this great est luxury of modern literature, we have determined to commit the task to no less intereste hand, but to devote to it our own highest personal effort. Accordingly, in our paper for the 8th of July, we commenced the publication of a

NOVEL BY GEORGE SAND (the authoress of Consuelo, and the most fervid and captivating writer of modern times),

TRANSLATED BY N. P. WILLIS. This has been followed by other novels, of great interest, which are continually added to by the successive numbers of these papers in France, supported by their most admirable mer and women of genius.

We take this opportunity to stand on tiptoe and look over the enlarging limits of our literar diocese---so many new subscribers, and many of them from so far, baving been added to our las since we last took an editorial survey, that we feel as if our thanks and welcome were all to be newly repeated. There is happiness for us, of course, in this enlargement of orbit and intin ence. We share the pulses of our brain and heart, now, with a thickly studded plain of humu hearts and intellects extending over all this vast republic-a parish of readers picked, we thin too, by sympathy with the peculiar and selective taste in which we have persevered, and we form now a Literary Public combined by no other accessible tie, and embracing all the bes and most liberal minds of the country.

For this public of taste, bound together on the subscription to THE HOME JNURNAL, we share purvey and labor with industry and care, increasing with its extent and with our conseque responsibility. We shall continue what we find has hit the humor of all our readers, as we as supplied a want to those who have been abroad, viz.

THE PARISIAN NEWS AND GOSSIP. Our careful choosings from the wilderness of English periodical literature will still give the cream of the

MINDS OF THE TIME, and from the innumerable ephemeral publications of England we shall gather our columns of

SMALL TALK, ANECDOTE, AND WIT. Without further repeating the list of THE HOME JOURNAL's carefully designed features attractions (the result of long experience in periodical literature), we would simply say that

NOW IS THE TIME TO SUBSCRIBE. Our former subscribers, and editorial allies, will oblige us by saying so to their friends, th securing to them what we think will be worth their while lo possess, a series of

PIQUANT STORIES otherwise unattainable, in addition to all the best

NEWS, HUMOR, GOSSIP, CRITICISM, and poetry of the day.

The very moderate price at which the paper is afforded (two dollars a year, or three cop for five dollars), brings it within the reach of the strictest economist ; and it is univers admitted to be, in its whole arrangement and details, the most valuable equivalent, for trifling amount of the subscription, ever offered to the-reading public. Those who wish receive the NEW VOLUME ENTIRE, will be crabled to do so by sending their names to the edit Witbout delay. Address

MORRIS & WILLIS, trillid

Office of Publication, No. 107 Fulton Street

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE

No. CCCXCV.

SEPTEMBER, 1848.

VOL. LXIV.

CONTENTS.

PAGE 261 290

.

A REVIEW OF THE LAST SESSION,
TO A CAGED SKYLARK. By B. SIMMONS,
SONNET.-TO DENMARK,
LIFE IN THE “Far West.” Part IV.,
THE CAXTONS. Part VI.,
LIFE AND TIMES

GEORGE II.,
THE GREAT TRAGEDIAN,
The Moscow Retreat,
WHAT WOULD REVOLUTIONIZING GERMANY BE AT ?

292 293 315 327 345 359 373

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NEW YORK:
PUBLISHED BY LEONARD SCOTT & CO.,

79 FULTON STREET, CORNER OF GOLD.

1848

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CCCXCV.

SEPTEMBER, 1848.

VOL. LXIV.

A REVIEW OF THE LAST SESSION.

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THERE is perhaps no body of men More than once, too, we have been confederated in her Majesty's domi- threatened at home by manifestations nions who are less properly the sub- of the insurrectionary spirit. In so jects of envy than the members of the densely populated a country as this, present Cabinet.

A session, begun it is impossible that commercial disunder circumstances of unexampled tress and slackness can exist for any commercial pressure, continued amidst length of time, without trying sorely insurrection abroad and turbulence at the patience and the fortitude of the home, and ending with an Irish re- working classes. Such distress unbellion, ought surely to have exhibited doubtedly did prevail, towards the some specimens of extraordinary and close of last year, in a most alarming judicious legislation. Slovenliness in degree; and throughout the whole high places, at no time decorous, is spring there was a vast want of emmost undecent, dangerous, and unen- ployment in the manufacturing disdurable, at a period when the whole tricts. The completion of some of the world is drunk with the revolutionary great lines of railway, and in others elixir. France, that old, irreclaimable the partial abandonment and suspension bacchante, is staggering to and fro, of the works, caused by the extreme madly bellicose, and threatening in- tightness of the money market, also cendiarism in her cups. Germany, threw a great deal of unemployed once thought too stolid to be roused, labour on the public; and this evil is hiccuping for national unity, and on was increased by the heterogeneous the fair way of contributing largely to character of the masses. Irish immi. the overthrow of the equilibrium of gration has increased to such an extent, power in Earope. The Irish symp. that not only in all the towns of Britoms have by no means surprised us. tain, but almost in every village, espeThe insurrection there is the inevitable cially on the western coast, there fruit of the measures and policy against exists a Hibernian colony: unrewhich, for the last twenty years, we claimed by civilization — uneducated have entered our strong and unflinch. as the brutes that perish-knowing ing protest. The shameful truckling nothing of religion, save as an idola. of the Whigs to O'Connell and his trous form, and professing rebellion scandalous followers; the unconsti• as a principle. This class have always tutional fostering of the Roman Ca- formed a nucleus for disaffection, and, tholic Church; and the conciliation but for the extreme reluctance of the system, which, while it did gross in- native labourers to fraternize with justice to the people of England and those children of Esau, the results Scotland, contributed to confirm the might ere now have been more serious spirit of improvidence and pauperism than we altogether care to contemamong the trish, without in any way plate. As it was, the British demasecuring their gratitude, -have re. gogue was always sure of finding a sulted in a rebellion, imbecile, indeed, ready partisan, confederate, and coand almost ludicrous in its issue, but adjutor in the Western Celt; and we not, on that account, less afflicting need hardly say that the Chartist to the supporters of order and the leaders availed themselves to the full

of that sympathy.

We shall pre18

Crown.

VOL. LXIV.

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