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had arisen in my connexions here. I believe I am respected far beyond what my real worth deserves, by all whose opinions are worth regarding.'-About a year before his death, referring to his birth-day, in a letter to his mother, he thus expresses bis distressing feelings : « The day on which yours is dated, is always with me a day of serious reflection, deep humiliation, and sometimes painful anxiety. You brought me into a sin. ful and distressing world; and, as the day returns, I often ask myself, Shall I live to see another? What will be the end of my hapless, fruitless; sinful life? I have known moments not a few, wherein I have deeply regretted that ever I was born; but we should endeavour to improve life, and not repine at it. We should learn to cast our care upon Him. Too often we suffer our sorrows and perplexities to obscure our views of the Divine Character; but let us consider that as an artifice of Satan, or an erroneous and miserable prejudice, which tends to lower our opinion, or relax our confidence in the wisdom, justice, and goodness of God.'

'Every affectionate relative,' say his brother Walter, will feel interest in the following passage. Referring to his farewell interview with his mother, when he left London for the last time in 1810, he thus wrote to her: 'Our parting was quite as ceremonious as it should have been, it was sanctified by prayer; though you said little, I could read your feelings; and instead of suspecting coolness, I saw and felt in your last look, what all language had in vain attempted to describe.'

Our deceased friend, in conformity with the custom of modern times, preached regularly three times on the Lord's Day, with the exception of the Sacramental Sabbaths; and once on a week-day evening. He also frequently preachedin the neighbouring villages; in which his services were peculiarly acceptable and specessful. On the well-known Jubilee Day in 1809, after preacting on that memorable occasion an excellent and appropriate sermon in bis own place, he waiked from Chester to Saitenhall. He partook of no refreshment; and, after a fatiguing journey, preached to a crowded audience in a confined place of worship. The exertion proved excessive, for his body was unfitted to sustaiu it; and the writer of this account las heard him deciaré, that he never was himself afterwurds! The first intimatiou wirich nis fainly received of bis last illness, was sent in a letter to his mother, about a year after the event referred to : My dear Mother,

Irish Sca, Oct. 4, 1810. You willbe surprized at receiving a letter dated fruin such a place and wonder what duty could call me to the great deep. -So it is, I am afloat in the vast channel that divides ire. land from Great Britam; the occas.on i ain not very wiling to disclose. For more than three months since, I have found myself absolutely incapable of public duty more than twice a

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day. On the Monday, and even on the Tuesday, I used to feel not only languid, but full of pain. At this time I caught a cold; which, availing itself of my dreadfully low and nervous state, took away my voice, and left a stubborn cough in its place. One of the first physicians in Chester happened to fall in with me at the side of a sick bed; it was a small, close, dark room; he took me out into the passage, and told me, be had previously determined to call upon me, judging, from my very sickly appearance, that I was getting into an alarming way. He remonstrated with me for visiting a sick chamber, and inhaling the breath of a dying person, myself being almost in that state. He called at my house, and made hinself more fully acquainted with my case. This induced him to go to the principal people of the church, telling them, that if they valued my life and ininistry, or wished not to be guilty of my death, they must dispense with my services for a month or more. They have accordingly found supplies for nearly three months; and, alas! I am yet no better!' Sea - an is strongly recommended; so I have taken a place in the Dublin packet, and am now rocking between Liverpool and the Irish shore. I have not been sea-sick, so that ihe end of my journey is not answered. The voyage has been rendercd unpleasant by the character and discourse of the company; ·

not a serious person on board! All profane swearers ! — and some disposed to ridicule me; because my appearance is grave, and my spirits are not equal to theirs !

On his arrival in Dublin he was introduced to a pious and respectable family; where he was most kindly received, and treated with all that Christian generosity and tenderness which are so highly ornamental, and shed upon the character of our religion its brightest lustre.

Mr. Wbite returned to Chester on the 20th of October, rather worse than better; and under the influence of that depression which was ever his greatest enemy, wrote as folloirs io bis inother :-'In addition to my bodily evils, I am the subject of great darkness and stupidity of mind. I can hardly think on divine things, or indeed any thing, for my mind is as feeble as any body. I have, however, sense enough left to hear sowe awful voices in this rod. God seems to say, “ Who sent you into my vineyard ?-- What hast thou to do, to declare my staluies- Give an account of thy stewardship!- Cast out the unprofitable scrvant! - Let anuther take his office !"I have many other disnal impressions; and my confidence is far too weak to etlace them. My only hope is the broad ground of gospel declaration, as that, - Christ came to save sinners ! - His blood cleanseth from all sin !- He is able to save!' &c. And sometimes, but very rarely, I have a humble hope that God intends to save me, though it be as by fire.

May you enjoy the most cheerful confidence and nearness to God

From this period no rational expectation was entertained by any of his friends of his recovery; and all his letters to his affectionate relatives in London, express his own apprehensions of what would be the inevitable result. In most of thein, alas! may be traced the gloomy dejection of his mind; yet occasionally are intermingled the pious aspirations of his soul, and expressions of confidence, which intimate, that still he was looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life.' The writer of this brief memorial, when he saw him for the last time, was inexpressibly grieved to witness the melancholy facility which he appeared io possess, of interpreting almost every scriptural passage that could be quoted, to increase the unhappy feeling which was so predominant in his mind. Having lost, by the gradual encroachments of a nervous cons'imption, his accustomed vigour of thought, he seemed to sink at times into unutterable sorrow; but now and then he recovered from these seasons of despondency! - Hope shed its glimmerings across his path, and he would assume the tone of cheerfulness and consolation. – Departed spirit, now amongst the just made perfect! thy last enemy is destroyed ; - every tear is wiped from thine eyes, and the days of thy mourning are ended! Thy sun shall no more go down, for the Lord shall be thine everlasting Light!

A few weeks before his departure he sent in his resignation of the pastoral office; and appears to have entertained some thoughts of visiting London, and closing his eyes amongst his relations. Such was the wish he expressed in his last letter to his brother Walter. It was the last he ever wrote; for the day after its arrival in London, information was received by the afflicted family, that their suffering and beloved relative had entered into his rest.

The ministerial qualifications of Mr. White were above the ordinary standard. He knew the Scriptures well, and brought from the sacred treasury things new and old. His mind was enlarged by extensive reading ;-and nothing of the bigot ever appeared in his discourses. His sentiments were Calvinistic, though his preaching never savoured of that school of theology which confines itself to a few favourite topics, and neglects other parts of the counsel of God,' equally true and important. It was his aim to be no wiser than the Scriptures, and to exbibit the doctrines of the gospel in their just and natural connections. Mr. White was a practical preacher, and failed not to enforce the holy tendencies of evangelical truth. In social converse, when some little peculiarities (for which his nervpus habits easily accounted, in the estimate of candour and Friendship) did not unfit hin for enjoying himself, he was affabie, communicative, and instructive; and hc bas often enlivened X IX.

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the circle of friends by his piety and information. His talents in composition were accurate and ready; and he especially excelled in epistolary correspondence.

The nature of Mr. White's disorder necessarily prevented him from exemplifying in his last illness, to that extent which could be wished, the consoling and supporting influence of evangelical truth; but though be never expressed the sentiments of rapturous confidence, it pleased God to abate the violence of those doubts and fears by which he had been so often tormented, and to enable him to commit his soul into the hands of Jesus Christ.' One of the last expressions which fell from his faltering lips was, 'He is able !' Before his death he often wished that, if it were the Lord's will, he might not lose one Sabbath by his affiction, and that he might enter into his rest on that sacred day. His submissive desire was gratified ! On the last Lore's Day in April, he went to the chapel in the morning. As he was returning, one of his friends expressed his regret at seing him in so very weak and debilitated a state, and gently remonstrated with him on his venturing out of the house. Do you think,' replied he with considerable animation, that I will ever desert the house of God? No, no, it is the house of God; and while I can, I will attend it. The following Thursday he was out for the last time; and the next Sabbath, May 5, 1811, early in the morning, as it began ta dawn,' be commenced the service of an eternal Sabbath in the heavenly temple.

His remains were interred in the burying-ground adjoining the chapel, on Tuesday the 14th of May. An iminense concourse of spectators, and a long train of mourning attendants, testified the respect in which he was held. Six ministers of various denominations resident in Chester, were bearers of the pail; and nine pastors of congregational churches attended on the occasion. The Rev. Mr. Charrier, of Liverpool, read appropriate portions of Scripture and prayed; the Rev. Mr. Spencer, of Liverpool, delivered the oration at the grave; and the Rev. Mr. Fletcher, of Blackburn, preached the funeral sermon, in the evening, from 2 Cor. iv. 7. On succeeding Sabbaths, in the same month, similar testimonies of affectionate regard were paid to his memory by the two last-mentioned ministers, at their respective places of Worship, expressive of their mutual attachment to one who sustained towards each of them the reJation of pastor.--May the Lord God of Elijah' be their God!

THE MISSIONARY'S FAREWELL. Mr. Editor,

Allow me, my dear Sir, cre I finally leave my native land, the privilege through the medium of your widely ex.

ded Miscellany) to take a finai adieu of my country, and of

May you enjoy the most cheerful confidence and nearness to God

From this period no rational expectation was entertained by any of his friends of his recovery; and all his letters to his affectionate relatives in London, express his own apprehensions of what would be the inevitable result. In most of thein, alas! may be traced the gloomy dejection of his mind; yet occasionally are intermingled the pious aspirations of his soul, and expressions of confidence, which intimate, that still he was looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life.' The writer of this brief memorial, when he saw himn for the last time, was inexpressibly grieved to witness the melancholy facility which he appeared io possess, of interpreting almost every scriptural passage that could be quoted, to increase the unhappy feeling which was so predominant in his mind. Having lost, by the gradual encroachments of a nervous consumption, his accustomed vigour of thought, he seemed to sink at times into unutterable sorrow; but now and then he recovered from these seasons of despondency! - Hope shed its glimmerings across his path, and he would assume the tone of cheerfulness and consolation. Departed spirit, now amongst the just made perfect! thy last enemy is destroyed ; — every tear is wiped from thine eyes, and the days of thy mourning are ended! Thy sun shall no more go down, for the Lord shall be thine everlasting Light!

A few weeks before his departure he sent in his resignation of the pastoral office; and appears to have entertained some thoughts of visiting London, and closing his eyes amongst his relations. Such was the wish he expressed in his last letter to his brother Walter. It was the last he ever wrote; for the day after its arrival in London, information was received by the afflicted family, that their suffering and beloved relative had entered into his rest.

The ministerial qualifications of Mr. White were above the ordinary standard. He knew the Scriptures well, and brought from the sacred treasury' things new and old.' His mind was enlarged by extensive reading ;

-and nothing of the bigot ever appeared in his discourses. His sentiments were Calvinistic, though his preaching never savoured of that school of theology which confines itself to a few favourite topics, and neglects other parts of the counsel of God,' equally true and important. It was his aion to be no wiser than the Scriptures, ani to exhibit the doctrines of the gospel in their just and natural connections. Mr. White was a practical preacher, and failed not to enforce the holy tendencies of evangelical truth. In social converse, when some little peculiarities (for which his nerv. ous habits easily accounted, in the estimate of candour and friendship) did not unfit him for enjoying himself, he was alfable, coumynicative, and instructive; and he bias often enlivened

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