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6 Come all about me! Come all about me!". At the sound of his voice his little ones used to rush forward, striving which should get the first kiss, or the best seat upon his knee. After that, they would often clamber about him; one holding him fast round his neck, this he called his collar; two would hang from his shoulders, these were his shoulder-knots; one clasping him round the waist, was his girdle; and one seated on each foot and clinging to his legs, he called his clogs; then taking an infant in his arms, the delighted father hobbled about the room, happier than the happiest of his laughing children!

Now this is, to me, a sweet family picture ; and when God-fearing parents and God-fearing children can thus find delight in each other's company, there is a fair prospect that they will not only share pleasure together on earth, but glory in heaven. It is under such circumstances as these that children bid fair to be blessings to their fathers and their mothers, to themselves, and to all around them. It is in such cases as these that the words in the 127th Psalm strike us as being full of beauty : “ Lo, children are an heritage of the Lord : and the fruit of the womb is his reward. As arrows are in the hand of a mighty man; so are the children of the youth. Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of

cut down : he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not,” Job xiv. 1, 2.

Baxter. Our lives, for the matter of that, are short, sure enough; but for one to die every second of time is the strangest thing that I ever heard of.

Visitor. The thought is enough to impress the most careless. Already another hundred souls have left this world, while you

and I have been continuing our conversation.

Look about you, Master Baxter, and prepare !

CALL ON THE FATHER OF A LARGE FAMILY.

Good day to you, Mr. Jones. Good day to you all, young people; you look as fresh and as clean this morning as I could wish to see you. As times go, Mr. Jones, you must have enough to do to bring up such a family as you have; but there is an old saying, that “when God is pleased to send mouths, he sends also something to put in them.” Men with large families, who fear God, do quite as well, so far as I can see, as those who have a fewer number to provide for. One of the most learned ministers of the gospel, who has not long exchanged earth for heaven, thought it quite a holiday to leave his books and to mingle with his children. On these occasions he would cry out to them,

Come all about me! Come all about me!”. At the sound of his voice his little ones used to rush forward, striving which should get the first kiss, or the best seat upon his knee. After that, they would often clamber about him; one holding him fast round his neck, this he called his collar; two would hang from his shoulders, these were his shoulder-knots; one clasping him round the waist, was his girdle; and one seated on each foot and clinging to his legs, he called his clogs; then taking an infant in his arms, the delighted father hobbled about the room, happier than the happiest of his laughing children!

Now this is, to me, a sweet family picture ; and when God-fearing parents and God-fearing children can thus find delight in each other's company, there is a fair prospect that they will not only share pleasure together on earth, but glory in heaven. It is under such circumstances as these that children bid fair to be blessings to their fathers and their mothers, to themselves, and to all around them. It is in such cases as these that the words in the 127th Psalm strike us as being full of beauty : “ Lo, children are an heritage of the Lord : and the fruit of the womb is his reward. As arrows are in the hand of a mighty man; so are the children of the youth. Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them : they shall not be ashamed, but they shall speak with the enemies at the gate."

I trust these few words will be an encouragement to you, Mr. Jones, amid the many cares which every one who brings up a large family must feel; for God can multiply his mercies faster than he has multiplied your children Good day to you all.

CALL ON THE SON OF A CHRISTIAN PARENT.

Oh! I have found you at last, but not without some trouble, I assure you, George. Three times have I passed up and down the next street, and not a single person could show me where you lived. This is the book of handbills that I procured for your father; when he comes from his work, perhaps you will give it him; he will find it full of admonition, given in a very striking manner. You live opposite the church, I

There is an old proverb, “The nearer the church, the further from God ;” meaning that some who have the best opportunity of obtaining spiritual knowledge, are more neglectful than their neighbours. Your father is a Godfearing man, George, and I know does his best to bring you up in the fear of the Lord. May the blessing of the Most High rest on his endeavours !

see.

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The church clock, I see, is somewhat out of repair. I remember reading that Frederick the Great, king of Prussia, coming to a village church, where the dial-plate of the clock was out of order, declared that his constitution was three times stronger and more durable than hardened iron : “ for,” said he, “the church clock, by the date, is only twenty-five years old, yet it is worn out; whereas I, who have been equally exposed to the elements, am seventy-five." Poor Frederick, strong as his constitution was, soon after that lay mouldering in the dust. He lived and died an infidel, and no hopeful ray of a glorious immortality brightened up the dark avenue of death when he passed through it. Better is it to be a God-fearing beggar, than a God-denying king!

Perhaps you will sometimes call this remark to remembrance when you look on the church clock. Ah! the hour is striking now! May it never strike unwelcome on a mis-spent hour, but always find you doing the will of your heavenly Father, and trusting for salvation in the merits and atonement of his Son Jesus Christ.

Mind that your father has the book as soon as he comes home, and it will not hurt you to take a peep in it yourself. Good day, George. I shall know where to find you another time.

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