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The appended extracts from Mr. Hill's late journals of his itinerant labours in the vicinity of Berhampore throw much light on the general character and condition of the native inhabitants in relation to their spiritual concerns. The Orphan Asylum, to which Mr. Hill adverts, was commenced in Berhampore several years ago. Our brother feels the utmost solicitude and interest on behalf of this institution, which, though not altogether of a Missionary character, will prove, it is hoped, a means of extensive good in this part of India. The following account of its design and operations is taken from the communication already noticed. After stating that the establishment of the Asylum originated in the liberal contributions of the late magistrate of Moorshedabad, David Dale, Esq., Mr. Hill, and other friends residing in the neighbourhood, the writer thus pro-, ceeds :

Those admitted are all native children port, in all cases coming voluntarily fordeprived of both parents, and under eight ward; for it is a principle in Mr. Hill's years of age. If much above that age their plan not to beg, but rather to struggle idolatrous impressions and habits will have through difficulties with a simple dependbecome somewhat fixed, and the less likely ence on a kind Providence. In 1835, an to be erased by a Christian education. They excellent civilian, now in Calcutta, most are instructed in reading, writing, and the liberally gave 500 rupees to commence the truths of Christianity, and, in due time, in farm. This contains 100 bighas of land, at the arts and manufactures of the country. As they grow up, the object is to locate was laid out in building and levelling the them together, and so form a native Chris. ground, and in planting 25 bighas of multian community, entirely supported by their berries, the profits of which are at present own industry. These objects are persever employed in extending the cultivation; this ingly and most industriously pursued ; and it is hoped will, ere the year ends, have it affords a most delightful treat to a bene. spread over 70 bigbás. It is then contemvolent mind to visit this infant establish plated to raise suitable buildings and proment, where, after early morning prayers cure apparatus, not only for the growth of and lessons, meals and relaxation are over, the silk-worm, but for the reeling of silk. you may find a number of poor orphans of The present number of orphans is 14 ; various ages learning to spin, to weave, to ten more are expected in this present month carpenter, &c.; not as an ungrateful task of December, and future additions will be arbitrarily and rigidly exacted, but kindly limited only by the means of supporting and considerately directed, and therefore them. cheerfully performed. Mr. Hill has tried I have reason to know that the Misvarious expedients for giving the lads useful sionary's personal sacrifices towards this employments, by which they may hereafter charitable object are not small; and I know be enabled to support themselves and their not one that presents a fairer claim to the future families. * * * The staple at present liberality of all who feel interested in the fu. is cotton thread and tapes of all descrip ture welfare of India. * * * As its protions.

spects brighten, however, it is fondly, and Mr. Hill has latterly taken a farm in the not without just reason hoped, that by the neighbourhood, on which, entirely at his blessing of Almighty God, the Berhampore own personal risk, he has located individuals Orphan Asylum, composed of industrious whom he can trust, and where by their la Christians, will become a true oasis in the bour he cultivates the mulberry; what he desert of ignorance, bigotry, and supersti. does not sell of this is employed in feeding tion; and will practically show to the surand rearing silk worms; and which, it is rouoding multitude the positive blessedness hoped, will ultimately produce a fund ade. of Christianity; and in progress of time quate to the support of the Orphan Institu. also, will, from its own resources, send out tion, to which it is entirely devoted.

and support its humble native Missionaries, The residents of the station have from and well-prepared prea-hers of the Gospel. time to time kindly contributed their sup

(To be continued.)

SOUTHERN INDIA.—CHITTOOR MISSION. Among the recent communications from the South of India, we have received the following, under date June 30, 1837, from the Rev. John Bilderbeck, of Chittoor,

which we are persuaded will be read with more than ordinary interest and plea

sure:

The Lord be praised for the privilege enjoyed these several years of making known the Gospel of his Son at this station, and in the surrounding districts. It is a privilege the exercise of which has not been without its peace-inspiring influence upon the heart, while the misgivings of the soul, and a consciousness of numerous infirmities in the discharge of the calling, are sufficient at the same time to fill the mind with the deepest contrition and humility before God. May the Lord mercifully forgive whatever has been wrong, and graciously vouchsafe his blessing upon his own work, to the praise and glory of his holy name! The following are the details of the labours at this station.

that have been gradually gaining ground from the beginning in their habits and conduct. Formerly, mendicity might have been mistaken for a regular profession of their lives ; now, the people are learning to provide for themselves by every honest labour. At one time the Missionary's assistance was often sought to adjust their many differ. ences; now, and for a long while past, not one instance of the kind has been known. Once it was necessary to visit them in their abodes on Saturday, to secure their attendance at the chapel on the Sabbath ; now, they voluntarily come to the house of God by their own accord, and in greater numbers than they have ever done, although the visits to their houses are but occasional. In former times there were scarcely any who could order their speech before God in prayer; now, there are some who can do so with propriety and unction; formerly, none were found either inclined or eligible for communion ; now, there are a few who appear as a sign unto the world, All these are changes that call for grateful acknowledgment to God, and which show that mourning is not unmingled with the spirit of thanksgiving. Though there is much to humble in the history of this Mission, and but little to gratify, yet that “little" is of Him who hath graciously promised, little one shall become a thousand, and a small one a strong nation : I the Lord will hasten it in his time !"

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Prayer for the Divine Influence. The weekly and monthly prayer-meetings have gone on as usual. The need of the effusion of the Holy Spirit, it is apprehended, is not sufficiently felt, or else greater numbers would willingly flock round the Father's throne. May the Lord, according to his promise, “pour upon the house of David and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem the Spirit of grace and of supplication !” Convinced of the necessity and blessedness of this Divine influence to render Missionary labours effectual, and to keep alive the love of Christ in the heart, a public special meeting was held at this station, on Friday the 30th of June, 1837. Several suitable resolutions were prepared on this subject, and the meeting was addressed with great feeling and animation by all the native teachers and readers of the out-stations, who were invited for the occasion. It was then agreed that such meeting be held every year for renewed dedication to God, and to his cause. Soon after the meeting was dissolved the native teachers and others joined together in ratifying their covenant with Jehovah at the table of the Lord. One, at least, can truly say, it was a season of peculiar refreshing from the presence of the Lord. Shame and confusion filled the breast under a consciousness of numerous infirmities, and a humble sense of the Divine love strengthened and summoned the energies for further perseverance in well-doing. Native Christians.-Comparative view.

As it regards the native Christians generally, while it is to be deeply lamented that real religion is dormant in many, and that spirituality is scarcely visible, yet it is some satisfaction for those who have had the oversight of them, to watch the changes

Labours among the Heathen. A great part of those who are accustomed to hear the word at Chittoor, consist of persons who come from distant districts to settle suits at court, and to transact other public business; and the rest are either the connexions of the convicts in the jail, or the relatives of those who fill respectable offices under Government at this station. The population of Chittoor itself is comparatively small, and is composed of Mohammedans, Telugus, and Tamulians, who are occupied as merchants, farmers, and mechanics. Those who come from distant countries have the advantage of taking with them to their different districts, when they return, what they hear and receive of the Gospel; but there are no means of tracing any further its effects upon their minds when they are once removed from the reach of observation. Eternity alone can disclose the results, while at present it is enough to rest upon God's promise that his “ word will not return unto him void, but it will accomplish that which he pleases."

As to others who are stationary in their location,

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feelings are apparently awakened which people, the wide commercial intercourse it seem at first to promise well, but they holds with many of the largest trading disprove either momentary, or, if indicated for tricts in this part of India, thereby openany length of time, are found to be suspi- ing a channel for Divine truth to such cious, discovering certain ulterior and secu- unoccupied fields as Hyderabad, Nellore, lar ends. The preaching of the word to Masulipatam, and Mysore, and more espesuch may be for the present regarded, per- cially its central position among other outhaps, merely as testimony;' time, stations visited by this Mission, affordhowever, will discover results. It is not ing every means of immediate access to the province of mortals to dive into futurity, the heathen; among others to Conjevetheirs is merely to obey a present command; ram,

that noted place of annual resort, the issue must be left with Him who will (Cholinger and Old Arcot, being close in command nothing that is truly impossible the vicinity,)—these circumstances, as well even when not understood. 1. Then said as its being secluded and free from even Daniel, O my Lord, what shall be the end foreign association, have all contributed to of these things ?” But God answered and invite serious attention to Walajahpettah as said, “Go thy way, Daniel : for the words a most desirable spot at which to form a are closed up and sealed till the time of the principal Mission. It also appears that a end !"

location there would bring the Missionary

to better than one-half the distance nearer Out-stations.-Walajahpettah.

to all his other out-stations, and so at once The vast population of this native town, facilitate the general superintendence of the the respectability and independence of its whole.

After mentioning the progress made towards effecting this arrangement, that a convenient spot of ground had been procured through the kindness of the collector, that a plan and estimate for suitable Mission premises had been prepared by a Christian friend of the Engineers, and that a sum of money amounting to 5001. sterling, and sufficient to cover all necessary expenses, had been given by another generous and valued friend of the Society, Mr. Bilderbeck proceeds with his account of the out-station Arnee.

directed his disciples to place a wooden A spirit of inquiry is gaining ground bench before him, and having wiped and put among the heathen at this place. Hales- a cloth upon it, begged that the books might worth continues most indefatigable in his be placed upon it. Halesworth immediexertions, and the people every where, with ately did so, and the priest then took them few exceptions, give him and his colleague from the table with apparent veneration, a favourable reception. Some of them often thanked him for the gift, and the next day call to see Halesworth, to converse with returned to his own district. him, and to ask for tracts.

There are many Jainas in and about

Arnee, and they are all a very mild, unsusHindus of the Jaina caste.

pecting, and plain-thinking class of people, A few months ago a priest of the Jaina but much disliked by the Brahmins, whom caste visited Halesworth's flock at Arnee, they never acknowledge. The writer is inof whom there is a great number; and, timate with a few of the most influential having heard of Halesworth, sent mes- among them, and peculiar gratification has sengers repeatedly to his house to beg a often been felt in conversing with them ; conference with him. Halesworth gladly they frankly concede to almost every docwent with his colleague, taking with him a trine, and the only stumbling-block in their good collection of choice tracts and Scrip- way at present is the practice common tures. After conversation on the leading among Europeans of killing and dressing truths of Christianity, the priest asked the animals for food. They are so tenacious teacher for some books which taught these about this, that they repeatedly strain water truths, that he might examine them for him- before it used. Nevertheless, it is a matself. Halesworth complied, and produced ter of fact, for it is a feeling that has been the tracts and Scriptures; but he was di- often heard and expressed, that a strong rected to place the whole of them on the conviction rests on their minds that Chrisground, as the priest was scrupulous about tianity will ultimately become the prevailing his caste. Halesworth with humble dignity religion. Oh blessed period ! speed, oh declined, and alleged that the books con- speed your approach ! for then religion will tained the word of God, and that it would consist not in “meats and drinks," which betray a want of respect to place them on profiteth nothing, but “in righteousness, the ground merely on the recommendation and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost !" of a man like himself. Upon this the priest

which we are persuaded will be read with more than ordinary interest and plea

sure:

The Lord be praised for the privilege enjoyed these several years of making known the Gospel of his Son at this station, and in the surrounding districts. It is a privilege the exercise of which has not been without its peace-inspiring influence upon the heart, while the misgivings of the soul, and a consciousness of numerous infirmities in the discharge of the calling, are sufficient at the same time to fill the mind with the deepest contrition and humility before God. May the Lord mercifully forgive whatever has been wrong, and graciously vouchsafe his blessing upon his own work, to the praise and glory of his holy name! The following are the details of the labours at this station.

that have been gradually gaining ground from the beginning in their habits and conduct. Formerly, mendicity might have been mistaken for a regular profession of their lives; now, the people are learning to provide for themselves by every honest labour. At one time the Missionary's assistance was often sought to adjust their many differences; now, and for a long while past, not one instance of the kind has been known. Once it was necessary to visit them in their abodes on Saturday, to secure their attendance at the chapel on the Sabbath ; now, they voluntarily come to the house of God by their own accord, and in greater numbers than they have ever done, although the visits to their houses are but occasional. In former times there were scarcely any who could order their speech before God in prayer; now, there are some who can do so with propriety and unction ; formerly, none were found either inclined or eligible for communion; now, there are a few who appear as a sign unto the world. All these are changes that call for grateful acknowledgment to God, and which show that mourning is not unmingled with the spirit of thanksgiving. Though there is much to humble in the history of this Mission, and but little to gratify, yet that “ little" is of Him who hath graciously promised, “a little one shall become a thousand, and a small one a strong nation : I the Lord will hasten it in his time !"

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Prayer for the Divine Influence. The weekly and monthly prayer-meetings have gone on as usual. The need of the effusion of the Holy Spirit, it is apprehended, is not sufficiently felt, or else greater numbers would willingly flock round the Father's throne. May the Lord, according to his promise, “pour upon the house of David and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem the Spirit of grace and of supplication !” Convinced of the necessity and blessedness of this Divine influence to render Missionary labours effectual, and to keep alive the love of Christ in the heart, a public special meeting was held at this station, on Friday the 30th of June, 1837. Several suitable resolutions were prepared on this subject, and the meeting was addressed with great feeling and animation by all the native teachers and readers of the out-stations, who were invited for the occasion. It was then agreed that such meeting be held every year for renewed dedication to God, and to his cause. Soon after the meeting was dissolved the native teachers and others joined together in ratifying their covenant with Jehovah at the table of the Lord. One, at least, can truly say, it was a season of peculiar refreshing from the presence of the Lord. Shame and confusion filled the breast under a consciousness of numerous infirmities, and a humble sense of the Divine love strengthened and summoned the energies for further perseverance in well-doing. Native Christians.-Comparative view.

As it regards the native Christians generally, while it is to be deeply lamented that real religion is dormant in many, and that spirituality is scarcely visible, yet it is some satisfaction for those who have had the oversight of them, to watch the changes

Labours among the Heathen. A great part of those who are accustomed to hear the word at Chittoor, consist of persons who come from distant districts to settle suits at court, and to transact other public business; and the rest are either the connexions of the convicts in the jail, or the relatives of those who fill respectable offices under Government at this station. The population of Chittoor itself is comparatively small, and is composed of Moham. medans, Telugus, and Tamulians, who are occupied as merchants, farmers, and mechanics. Those who come from distant countries have the advantage of taking with them to their different districts, when they return, what they hear and receive of the Gospel ; but there are no means of tracing any further its effects upon their minds when they are once removed from the reach of observation. Eternity alone can disclose the results, while at present it is enough to rest upon God's promise that his “ word will not return unto him void, but it will accomplish that which he pleases." As to others who are stationary in their location,

a

feelings are apparently awakened which people, the wide commercial intercourse it seem at first to promise well, but they holds with many of the largest trading disprove either momentary, or, if indicated for tricts in this part of India, thereby openany length of time, are found to be suspi- ing a channel for Divine truth to such cious, discovering certain ulterior and secu- unoccupied fields as Hyderabad, Nellore, lar ends. The preaching of the word to Masulipatam, and Mysore, and more espesuch may be for the present regarded, per- cially its central position among other outhaps, merely as “ testimony;" time, stations visited by this Mission, afford. however, will discover results. It is not ing every means of immediate access to the province of mortals to dive into futurity, the heathen; among others to Conjevetheirs is merely to obey a present command; ram, that noted place of annual resort, the issue must be left with Him who will (Cholinger and Old Arcot, being close in command nothing that is truly impossible the vicinity,)--these circumstances, as well even when not understood. " Then said as its being secluded and free from even Daniel, O my Lord, what shall be the end foreign association, have all contributed to of these things ?” But God answered and invite serious attention to Walajahpettah as said, “Go thy way, Daniel : for the words a most desirable spot at which to form a are closed up and sealed till the time of the principal Mission. It also appears that a end !"

location there would bring the Missionary

to better than one-half the distance nearer Out-stations.- Walajahpettah.

to all his other out-stations, and so at once The vast population of this native town, facilitate the general superintendence of the the respectability and independence of its whole.

After mentioning the progress made towards effecting this arrangement, that a convenient spot of ground had been procured through the kindness of the collector, that a plan and estimate for suitable Mission premises had been prepared by a Christian friend of the Engineers, and that a sum of money amounting to 5001. sterling, and sufficient to cover all necessary expenses, had been given by another generous and valued friend of the Society, Mr. Bilderbeck proceeds with his account of the out-station Arnee.

directed his disciples to place a wooden A spirit of inquiry is gaining ground bench before him, and having wiped and put among the heathen at this place. Hales- a cloth upon it, begged that the books might worth continues most indefatigable in his be placed upon it. Halesworth immediexertions, and the people every where, with ately did so, and the priest then took them few exceptions, give him and his colleague from the table with apparent veneration, a favourable reception. Some of them often thanked him for the gift, and the next day call to see Halesworth, to converse with returned to his own district. him, and to ask for tracts.

There are many Jainas in and about

Arnee, and they are all a very mild, unsusHindus of the Jaina caste.

pecting, and plain-thinking class of people, A few months ago a priest of the Jaina but much disliked by the Brahmins, whom caste visited Halesworth's flock at Arnee, they never acknowledge. The writer is inof whom there is a great number; and, timate with a few of the most influential having heard of Halesworth, sent among them, and peculiar gratification has sengers repeatedly to his house to beg a often been felt in conversing with them ; conference with him. Halesworth gladly they frankly concede to almost every docwent with his colleague, taking with him a trine, and the only stumbling-block in their good collection of choice tracts and Scrip- way at present is the practice common tures. After conversation on the leading among Europeans of killing and dressing truths of Christianity, the priest asked the animals for food. They are so tenacious teacher for some books which taught these about this, that they repeatedly strain water truths, that he might examine them for him- before it is used. Nevertheless, it is a matself. Halesworth complied, and produced ter of fact, for it is a feeling that has been the tracts and Scriptures; but he was di- often heard and expressed, that a strong rected to place the whole of them on the conviction rests on their minds that Chrisground, as the priest was scrupulous about tianity will ultimately become the prevailing his caste. Halesworth with humble dignity religion. Oh blessed period ! speed, oh declined, and alleged that the books con- speed your approach! for then religion will tained the word of God, and that it would consist not in “meats and drinks, which betray a want of respect to place them on profiteth nothing, but “in righteousness, the ground merely on the recommendation and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost!" of a man like himself. Upon this the priest

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