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IX. 5 And over it the cherubims of glory shadowing the merg seat; of which we cannot now speak particularly. And over it were those glorious Cherubims, whose wings, being spread forth, shadowed the cover of the ark, which was called the Mercy Seat; of all which several things, there is no need, in this place, to make a particular discourse.

IX. 6 The priests went always into the first tabernacle, accomplishing the service of God. The priests went daily into the first room of the tabernacle, accomplishing those ordinary services of God, which were required of them in their daily ministration.

IX. 7 But into the second went the high priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself, and for the errors of the people : But into the second or inner room of the tabernacle, went the high priest alone, once every year, not without a solemn sacrifice, first offered, and the blood thereof sprinkled about, for the expia. tion of his own sins, and for the errors and oversights of the people:

IX. 8 The Holy Ghost this signifying, that the way into the holiest of all was not yet made manifest, while as the first tabernacle was yet standing : The Holy Ghost signifying this mystery unto us, that, while the outer room of the tabernacle, whereby was signified the state of the Church under the Law, stood, separated by a veil from the boliest of all, which represented heaven, the way to heaven, howsoever it were known to some few, yet was not openly manifested to the world, as it was by Christ afterward:

IX. 9 Which was a figure for the time then present, in which were offered both gifts and sacrifices, that could not make him that did the service perfect, as pertaining to the conscience; Which outward room of the tabernacle, and the court leading thereinto, was a figure of the then present time and condition under the Old Law, wherein were offered both gifts and sacrifices of all kinds; yet such as, in and of themselves, had no power or vir. tue, to acquit and justify him that did that service, and to appease and clear the conscience in spiritual matters;

IX. 10 Which stood only in meats and drinks, and divers wash. ings, and carnal ordinances, imposed on them until the time of reformation. Which said law consisted, for the most part, in the differences of meats and drinks, clean and unclean, in divers washings and rinsings, and manifold outward bodily ceremonies and ritual observa. tions, imposed upon the Jewish people, until the time of the New Testament; wherein the Messiah should rectify and reform and supply, whatsoever was amiss or wanting in their performances.

IX. 11 But Christ being come a high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building;

But Christ being now come, a true and ever-glorious High Priest, bringing and obtaining eternal happiness to his Church, hath, in his human nature, which is a more noble and excellent Tabernacle than that material one, and of a divine making, whereas that other was made by the hands of men;

IX. 12 Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood; he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us. Not with the shedding and sprinkling of the blood of, whether goats or calves, or any other beasts; but, having willingly shed his own most precious blood, he entered once for all into the high and holy heavens, having thereby redeemed us from sin and death, and obtained an everlasting inheritance for us.

IX. 13, 14 For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of a heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh: How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God! For if the blood of bulls, &c. sanctified so far, as to wash off a legal impurity from the flesh: How much more shall the blood of Christ, who, by the motion of his Eternal Spirit, the infinite efficacy and power whereof made his death fully meritorious and perfectly available, offered himself, as a most pure and spotless sacrifice unto God, purge and cleanse your conscience from all those sinful and odious corruptions, which are noisome to God and deadly to your own souls; that ye might be wholly consecrated to the service of the true and living God.

IX. 15 And for this cause he is the Mediator of the New Testament, that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first Testament, they which are called might receive the promise of eternal inheritance. And, for this cause, is he the Mediator of the New Testament : not that he might flourish and reign upon earth, in an outward pomp, as ye Jews vainly imagine; but that he might suffer death, even for those transgressions under the Old Testament, which the blood of beasts could no way expiate; and that all those, which are effectually called by him, might receive the promise and performance of an eternal inheritance.

IX. 16 For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator. Neither should it seem strange to you, to hear of the death of the Messiah; for, where a testament is, there must be also of necessity the death of the testator.

IX. 19 He took the blood of calves and of goats, with water, and scarlet wool, and hyssop, and sprinkled both the book, and all the people. He took the blood of calves and goats, mixing it with water that it might not clodder and congeal together; and, dipping therein scarlet wool which might drink up and retain it, and sprigs of hyssop that might disperse it abroad, he sprinkled therewith both the

book of the law and the people, to signify that neither that la could be fulfilled, nor the people freed from their sins, but only by the blood of Christ.

IX. 22 And without shedding of blood is no remission. Without shedding and sprinkling of blood, there was no doing away of any legal impurities; and without Christ's blood shed, no doing away of any spiritual or moral impurity of the soul.

IX. 23 It was therefore necessary that the patterns of things in the heavens should be purified with these; but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these. It was therefore necessary that this earthly tabernacle, which was a pattern of the heavenly and spiritual, should be thus consecrated with these earthly rites, and with the blood of beasts; but the true spiritual and heavenly tabernacle, which is his Holy Church itself, was to be purified with a better sacrifice, even with the blood of Christ.

IX. 24 For Christ is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the figures of the true; but into heaven itself. For Christ is not entered into that external and material Holy of Holies, which was a type of that true and blessed sanctuary of bea. ven, but into the very heaven itself.

IX. 28 So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation. So Christ was once offered, to make full satisfaction for the sins, not of some few, but of many, yea, of all mankind, if they could all believe in him; and unto those that are his, who love and look for his glorious appearance, shall he come again and shew himself; not in infirmity, as before, but with power; not to be offered up again for sin, but to judge sinners, and to perfect the salvation of his elect,

X. 1 For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect. The Spiritual state of things is like unto a picture, wherein there are, first, some rude lines chalked out; afterward, the colours are laid, and the full resemblance expressed: even so it was here: the Law was but as the first rude draught of good things to come, and had not the full image or lively expression of the things themselves; and therefore could never, by those shadowy sacrifices, which they offered continually, year by year, make perfect those that followed the rules and practice thereof.

X. 2 For then would they not have ceased to be offered ? because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins. For, where there is no sin, there needs not be any offering for sin : if, therefore, sin bad been done fully away by those offerings, what use could there have been of any more oblations? since that

these legal worshippers, being once purged from their sin, should have found no more trouble in their conscience for that sin, from which they were once cleared.

X. 3 But in those sacrifices there is a remembrance again made of sins every year. But now, it is plain, that, in these legal sacrifices, there is a continual refrication of the memory of those sins every year, which we have committed ; soʻ as we are put in mind, both of our guilt thereby, and of satisfaction to be made unto God for it.

X. 5 Wherefore when he cometh into the world, he saith, Sacris fice and offering thou wouldest not, but a body hast thou prepared me, Wherefore, when he intimates the incarnation of Christ and his coming into the world in the flesh, he saith, Sacrifice and oblation is not the thing that thou restest in, or wherein thou receivest full satisfaction ; but thou hast personally designed me to thy perfect and entire service, both in doing and suffering; and thereby art reconciled to the world.

X. 7 Then said I, Lo, I come (in the volume of the book it is written of me,) to do thy will, O God. See Psalm xl. 7.

X. 9 He taketh away the first, that he may establish the second. He taketh away the use of sacrifices and oblations, that he may establish the perfect use and improvement of Christ's incarnation and exquisite obedience.

X. 10 By the which will we are sanctifed, through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all. That will, which Christ came to do, was God's decree of his perfect fulfilling the Law, and suffering death for our Redemption; by the exact performance whereof, we are sanctified, through his voluntary offering of himself to death, once for all mankind.

X. 11 And every priest standeth daily ministering and offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins. Every priest, after the Levitical order, is employed daily, in his external ministration, and offereth oftentimes the same kind of outward and bodily sacrifices, which yet have not the virtue to take away any sins at all.

X. 14 For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. For, by one offering, he hath perfectly satisfied for all those, whom he hath chosen to himself; and hath thereby wrought out the salvation of all those, which are or shall be, in all times, sanctified to his service and glory.

X. 19 Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the Holiest by the blood of Jesus ; Now, therefore, seeing we see so happy a change made, that, whereas under the Law none but the high priest might enter into the Holy of Holies with the blood of beasts, now we all may have free entrance into heaven itself, which is the truth and substance of that shadow, through the precious blood of Jesus Christ;

X. 20 By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh;

As under the Law, the high priest passed through the veil into the Holy of Holies; so now, under the Gospel, the veil, through which we must enter into the Holy Heavens, is the flesh of Christ: that is the new and everliving way, which is ordained and consecrated for our only passage into glory:

X. 21 And having a high priest over the house of God; And having now, instead of that Levitical Priesthood, so absolute and glorious a High Priest, set over the whole Church of God;

X. 22 Let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience, and our bodies washed with pure water. Let us do all things really and spiritually, which were signified by those external rites; and, therefore, let us draw near unto God, not with outward aspersions, but with a true heart, in full conf. dence and stedfast reliance upon the mercies of God; having, instead of those outward sprinklings of the body, our hearts sprink. led and cleansed from an evil conscience, even from all our sinful corruptions; and our bodies washed, as with baptismal water, whereby we are initiated into the Church, so also sanctified by the Spirit of God, and delivered from all filthiness of sin.

X. 24 And let us consider one another, to provoke unto lope and to good works : And let us have a charitable and tender respect one to another : instead of those strange and envious dispositions and carriages that are wont to be betwixt Jews and Gentiles, let us so frame ourselves and our affections, as that we may draw on each other to mutual love and good works :

X. 25 Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting one another : and so much the more, as ye see the day approaching. Not withdrawing and utterly separating ourselves from the assemblies of God's people, upon conceit of the peculiar rights and prerogatives, which God hath given to the Jews above the Gentiles; and standing upon the high terms of difference, as the manner of some is; but rather encouraging and exhorting one another to these holy services; and so much the ratber, now, because ye know, that the day of the Lord's coming draweth on.

X. 26, 27 For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, But a certain fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indignation, which shall devour the adversaries For, if we do wilfully abandon the Church of God, and fall totally away from that saving truth and holy religion, wbich we have received the knowledge of and professed to embrace ; purposely and maliciously opposing ourselves thereunto, thus sinning against the Holy Ghost; there remaineth no way or mean to expiate our sin, since that blood of Christ, which is the only sacrifice for sin, is thus by us contemned and trodden under foot; Neither doth or can ought remain for us, in this fearful and deplorable condition, but a certain dreadful expectation of God's terrible judgments;

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