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subdue the disposition there. The best method of correcting our own inconsistencies is to become better acquainted with our own hearts, whence all our conduct is derived. If it is the conduct of others we have to do with, whether to judge or to correct, the success of our endeavours and the justpess of our judgment mainly depend on our looking beyond the apparent inconsistency to its cause, and ascribing it to its right source. Want of information, or a bad judgment, claim very unequal censure, as well as a very different remedy, from that which is due to dishonesty of purpose.

I know a young person to whom circumstances have given considerable controul in her parents' house-she devotes time and talents to the management and education of her sisters, and says she has nothing so much at heart as their happiness and improvement. To effect this she keeps the house in perpetual contention-she makes their wishes and tastes yield in every thing to hers-she finds fault with every thing they do, complains of every thing that happens to interrupt her purposes, condemns every thing that does not exactly meet her ideas reasonable or unreasonable, nothing must take place in the family that does not exactly suit her convenience, and what does suit her convenience must be done at any rate. One of two things is the case-either she is dishonest in her purpose, and while she seems to devote her time and attention to her family, she really desires nothing but the indulgence of her own self-will, or she wants judgment to perceive that always giving herself the preference, is not the way to make others good or happy; and that the devotion of all her time, talents, and powers, to the annoying, contradicting, and molesting every one about her, is not a very consistent sort of sisterly devotion. If I were not indisposed to say any thing to any body above twenty years of age, I might just drop a hint that there are some devoted wives, and devoted mothers, and devoted mistresses, who do exactly the same thing. Did having chosen the object of existence, employs the powers of existence to the attainment of that object--and in each particular, having formed a purpose, to do and to be what will promote that purpose. The inconsistency of the greater number of persons arises from their having conscience enough, and moral sense enough, to perceive what their objects ought to be, and to determine their choice for good, while they have neither sense enough, nor virtue enough, to pursue it: and so the means and the end are for ever at variance, and the strangest inconsistencies are the result.

The world in general-I mean the decent and moral part of it, for the out-lawed rioter in mischief we must leave to the full credit of his consistency-confess an end and object of existence which yet they do not pursue. We thus act exactly like a traveller, who wishing to go to Greenwich, should on reading the way-post that directs him thither, turn off to the other hand, and proceed to London : of such a traveller we should say that either he could not read, or that he wanted understanding, or that he did not really desire to go to the place he professed to set out for. And so we may say in effect of all the inconsistencies of life and conduct-they arise in ignorance, mis-judgment, or dishonesty.

I will illustrate my meaning by a few examples—not of the most important, perhaps, for it is not in great matters that we make the most mistakes it is the familiar occurrences of daily life that make

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the character and conduct of persons in ordinary life. When symptoms of physical disorder are to be cured, the cause of those symptoms must be discovered and removed : so when descrepancies of conduct and inconsistency of character are to be corrected, the better way is to proceed at once to the source whence they spring-we all know by experience how difficult it is to correct bad habits—perhaps the difficulty would be lessened if, instead of attempting to cure the manifestation of the evil, we were to descend into our hearts, see whence it arises, and

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subdue the disposition there. The best method of correcting our own inconsistencies is to become better acquainted with our own hearts, whence all our conduct is derived. If it is the conduct of others we bave to do with, whether to judge or to correct, the success of our endeavours and the justness of our judgment mainly depend on our looking beyond the apparent inconsistency to its cause, and ascribing it to its right source. Want of information, or a bad judgment, claim very unequal censure, as well as a very different remedy, from that which is due to dishonesty of purpose.

I know a young person to whom circumstances have given considerable controul in her parents' house-she devotes time and talents to the management and education of her sisters, and says she has nothing so much at heart as their happiness and improvement. To effect this she keeps the house in perpetual contention-she makes their wishes and tastes yield in every thing to hers-she finds fault with every thing they do, complains of every thing that happens to interrupt her purposes, condemns every thing that does not exactly meet her ideas reasonable or unreasonable, nothing must take place in the family that does not exactly suit her convenience, and what does suit her convenience must be done at any rate. One of two things is the case-either she is dishonest in her purpose, and while she seems to devote her time and attention to her family, she really desires nothing but the indulgence of her own self-will, or she wants judgment to perceive that always giving herself the preference, is not the way to make others good or happy; and that the devotion of all her time, talents, and powers, to the annoying, contradicting, and molesting every one about her, is not a very consistent sort of sisterly devotion. If I were not indisposed to say any thing to any body above twenty years of age, I might just drop a hint that there are

I some devoted wives, and devoted mothers, and devoted mistresses, who do exactly the same thing. Did

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this traveller never mean to go to Greenwich? Or, on arriving at the way post, and reading “To London," did she conclude that that would bring her there?

I know another who seems very anxious to be sought and beloved by her companions in society, complains perpetually that nobody cares for her, and every body neglects her, and she receives no attention and no kindness from any one. Meantime, if she sees these people whose inattention displeases her, she goes across the street to avoid meeting them: when she comes into company, she sits in dogged and sullen silence, or only speaks to declare that she hates all company and is never happy but when she is alone, or to say something rude or impertinent to the society in general, or to some one in particular: if any offer of kindness is made her, she refuses it—if any particular attention is paid her, she attributes it to some sinister motive. Now, as I am satisfied from this lady's uneasiness, that she is honest in her wish to be beloved, she must either, like the last traveller, think the way to reach her destination is to turn out of the road, or she must be unable to read, and really believe that L-o-n-d-o-n spells Greenwich-that is, she must think the way to be desired and sought in society is to be very disagreeable, or that d-i-s-l-i-k-e-d really spells beloved; and so with honest ignorance takes the way to it.

A third I could point out, who desires, as I understand from herself, to improve her talents and inform her mind, that when the transient beauty of her person shall have passed, and the zest of exterior amusements shall have passed, she may not be to others as a thing that has lost its value, to herself as one that has expended her possessions. But with ample powers and all means at command, she stands for an hour together at the fire-place, watching the reflection of the lustresshe begins to yawn at nine o'clock, and goes to bed at ten-is up, but not dressed, about the same hour in the morning-takes half an hour to put on her bonnet when

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every body, for no better reason than because they are not like ourselves. In great things and in small things, from the important features of moral rectitude to the trifling ornaments of exterior propriety, Self is our standard, and all is right or wrong, admired or condemned, as it agrees with or departs from this standard, this household deity, that each one has made for himself, and fashioned to his own taste that he may worship it. CONSISTENCY, therefore, a word that in the language of christianity should mean conformity to our Maker's will, has come in common language to mean little else than conformity to the narrow ideas of the individual who uses it.

CONVERSATIONS ON GEOLOGY.

CONVERSATION V.

There are many

MRS. L.-Our business to-day is with the Primary or Primitive Rocks, so called from their being the lowest with which we are acquainted, and to all appearance the first formed-at least the earliest deposited in their present situation on the earth's surface. reasons beside their actual position, which lead to this conclusion, and seem to designate the Granite Rocks as the mould on which the Creator formed and shaped the earth; though proofs are not wanting of their having materially changed their forms by eruption or otherwise. No organic remains, the remnants or impressions, that is, of living things, whether animal or vegetable, are found in these rocks: whence it has been inferred that they were formed before the existence of living things. This inference, though very reasonable and most probably just, does not amount to certainty, because the rocks might be so formed by combustion, as to

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