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therefore, that the Greeks, who were serving in Darius' army, exhorted him to remain in the plains where all his troops might be drawn up, or to separate, and attack the Greeks in different bodies. The Persian courtiers traduced as traitors those who suggested such a plan, alleging that they advised to divide the troops in order to weaken them, and give them into the hands of the enemy. They also made Darius believe the Greeks were flying before him, and that he ought to pursue them to the passes of the mountains, in order to destroy their force while entangled among them. This step decided the fate of the Persian empire. Alexander, when he heard of Darius' approach, could scarcely believe a circumstance so exactly suited to his wishes; he waited for him, and having offered a sacrifice to the gods, drew up his army on a spot of ground near the city of Issus, bounded on one side by the mountains, on the other side by the sea. Here Darius, having no room to extend his forces, was obliged to draw up his lines one behind another, so that the Macedonians attacked and defeated them in succession. The first line was soon broken and recoiled upon the second—that upon the third, and so on till the whole army was in disorder. Those of the Persians whose courage would still have maintained the struggle, were lost in the crowd; Darius, among the rest, with difficulty got through the throng, and fled in his chariot to the mountains, where he mounted a horse and pursued his flight, leaving behind him bis bow, his shield, and royal mantle: the Greek mercenaries of his army alone saved him from being pursued and taken, by fighting, till from 20,000 they were reduced to 8,000. Part of the royal family and their treasures were taken in the camp; the remainder having been removed to Damascus, were afterwards taken with that city. Such was the famous battle of Issus, 333, B.C.

Alexander next marched into Syria, where the commanders of Darius readily delivered their cities and

arms.

tipt with gold; after these marched 30,000 foot, the rear of the army, and lastly, 400 led horses belonging to the king. At a small distance followed Sysigambis, the king's mother, and his consort, seated on high chariots, with a numerous train of female attendants on horseback, and fifteen chariots, in which were the king's children, and those who were charged with their education. Next to these were the royal concubines, to the number of 360, all attired like queens: they were followed by 600 mules, and 300 camels, which carried the king's treasures, and were guarded by a body of bow-men; the march was closed by a great many chariots, carrying the wives of the crown officers and lords of the court, and guarded by some companies of foot lightly armed. The splendid incumbrance of such an armament, is in itself sufficient to account for the rapid success of Alexander's

Our minds are apt to be dazzled and surprised by the extent and rapidity of his victories, and falsely to regard his character as great in proportion to his successes-we shall speak more of this in his own history; but would here have it observed what were the enemy with whom the poor and hardy Greeks had to contend -a nation widely victorious indeed, but it had been over people of habits and character like their own—and under a brave commander, but one who had no real soldiers to command, and was encumbered with such armaments as we have described; more like the procession of a masque

than the movement of an army. Alexander waited for Darius in the mountains of Cilicia, where the narrowness of the passes made the multitude of his train still more unmanageable. Darius either knew nothing of the art of war, or would not depart from the customs of his nation--a peculiar characteristic of the eastern world, where nothing yielded to time and circumstance, but must always continue what it always had been ; this constancy extended to every thing, from the arrangements of the battle, to the fashion of their garments. It was in vain,

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therefore, that the Greeks, who were serving in Darius' army, exhorted him to remain in the plains where all his troops might be drawn up, or to separate, and attack the Greeks in different bodies. The Persian courtiers traduced as traitors those who suggested such a plan, alleging that they advised to divide the troops in order to weaken them, and give them into the hands of the enemy. They also made Darius believe the Greeks were flying before him, and that he ought to pursue them to the passes of the mountains, in order to destroy their force while entangled among them. This step decided the fate of the Persian empire. Alexander, when he heard of Darius' approach, could scarcely believe a circumstance so exactly suited to his wishes ; he waited for him, and having offered a sacrifice to the gods, drew up his army on a spot of ground near the city of Issus, bounded on one side by the mountains, on the other side by the sea. Here Darius, having no room to extend his forces, was obliged to draw up his lines one behind another, so that the Macedonians attacked and defeated them in succession. The first line was soon broken and recoiled upon the second—that upon

the third, and so on till the whole army was in disorder. Those of the Persians whose courage would still have maintained the struggle, were lost in the crowd; Darius, among the rest, with difficulty got through the throng, and fled in his chariot to the mountains, where he mounted a horse and pursued his flight, leaving behind him his bow, his shield, and royal mantle : the Greek mercenaries of his army alone saved bim from being pursued and taken, by fighting, till from 20,000 they were reduced to 8,000. Part of the royal family and their treasures were taken in the remainder having been removed to Damascus, were afterwards taken with that city. Such was the famous battle of Issus, 333, B.C.

Alexander next marched into Syria, where the commanders of Darius readily delivered their cities and

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camp; the

word of the gospel he professes, those who love it and are tenacious of its glory must mark their disapprobation of this conduct, by so far withdrawing their countenance from the culprit, as shall make him feel and be ashamed for his defection: they must show that they are wounded in the wounding of their Lord, and in his dishonour feel themselves dishonoured. They must not leave the world to suppose them a party to the wrong, by manifesting no disapproval of it, nor the guilty brother to doubt if it be wrong, since it brings on him no shame. But so prone is man to do amiss even that he ought to do, that it is very seldom this is done in a proper spirit, or within due limits. Instead of admonishing the erring christian as a brother—a brother still, and therefore still fraternally beloved, although in error-we begin to account, or at least to intreat him as an enemy-to speak to him with haughtiness, and of him with bitterness-sullenly abandoning or harshly rejecting him, instead of trying by gentle admonition to win him back again. If our Lord were in as much haste to disown his children as we are to expel them from our brotherhood—if he were as zealous to raise the war-cry of enmity against the defaulter as we are to sound it for him, woe would it be to his family upon earth. I fear we shall many of us have to answer for the lengthened wandering of the erring sheep, by the eagerness with which we close the fold against him, the little willingness we show to receive him back again-treated as an enemy, enmity gets stronger possession of his mind—when admonished as a brother, he might remember his fraternity and be softened into penitence.

Et c'est ici la volonté de Dieu, savoir, votre sanctifi

cation - I THESSAL, iv. 3. ENFIN la nécessité des progrès dans la sanctification, paroit par le but que Dieu s'est proposé en nous plaçant sur la terre. On a eu souvent de la peine à concevoir comment Dieu logeoit l'homme, cette créature si noble,

sur le théatre des vanités et de l'inconstance. On n'a pû comprendre ce qu'est notre vie, trente, quarante, quatre-vingts années dans l'immense océan de l'éternité. On n'a pû accorder le rôle que nous jouons ici bas, avec la sagesse de celui qui nous y a mis, et s'il m'est permis d'ainsi dire, la petitesse du monde, avec la grandeur de ses habitans.

Quelle destination assignerez-vous à l'homme ? Quel but attribuerez-vous à son Créateur ? Pourquoi nous mettre dans ce monde? Etoit-ce pour nous y rendre heureux ? Mais quoi? En nous environnant d'objets si peu proportionnés à nos facultés ? En mettant notre fortune, notre reputation, notre vie, en butte à toutes les vicissitudes humaines ? Etoit-ce pour nous rendre miserables ? Mais comment accorder ces vûes avec les perfections de Dieu ? Avec cette bonté, avec cette charité, avec cette liberalité qui fait son essence ? Etoit-ce de nous faire cultiver les sciences et les beaux arts? Mais quelle relation d'une occupation si vile, avec un être si noble? D'ailleurs, auroit-il faller renfermer notre vie dans de si étroites bornes? Helas ! à peine avons-nous fait quelque progrés dans les arts, et dans les sciences, qu'elles nous deviennent inutiles! A peine sommes-nous sortis du noviciat de l'enfance, que la mort arrête nos projets, et nous enleve aux fruits de nos decouvertes et de nos lumières : à peine avons-nous appris les langues, que la mort nous condamne à ne plus parler: à peine connoissons-nous le monde, que nous sommes appellés à le quitter : à peine savons-nous vivre, qu'il faut mourir. Que si le fameux Théophraste à l'age de cent sept ans, regrettoit la vie, parce qu'il commençoit alors à pouvoir vivre avec sagessse, combien de regrets n'ont pas à former les autres hommes ? Quel à été donc ce but de Dieu en nous plaçant sur la terre ?' A ce été de former une société et de l'entretenir ? Mais cette société composée de créatures si passagères et si inconstantes, peut-elle étre regardée comme un tout réel et solide? Et si elle a quelque solidité et quelque réalité,

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