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REVIEW OF RELIGIOUS PUBLICATIONS, &c. .

rice 28:

An Address to the Public, upon the discussed, and should form - the

Dangerous Tendency of ihe Lon chief object of this Address:' and if don Female Penitentiary ; with any thing can still farther increase Hints, relative to the best Means our astonishment it is this, That as of lessening the Sum of Prostitu

the principle alone was assailed, tion. By W. Hale. Price 1s. which is equally the basis of other

similar Institutions, the London Fe. The following Answers have appeared: male Penitentiary should exclusively Prostitutes Reclaimed and Penitents be made the object of attack from : Protected ; being an Answer to the pen of so respectable a gentlosome Objections made against the man as Mr. Hale, without the most .' Principle and Tendency of the Lon- distant allusion to previously exist. - 1don Female Penitentiary; with ing charities of the same descripObservations on Licensed Brothels, tion !!

and the Means of discouraging When a society, the object of Prostitution. By W. Blair, Esq. which is to afford shelter to poor Surgeon of the Lock Hospital and midnight wanderers for bread, Asylum; of the London Female Pe- to pluck their feet from the path of nitentiary, &c. Price 28.

the destroyer, and to bring them to The Remonstrant : a Letter to Mr.

: Jesus, is thus openly opposed, the W. Hale, in Reply to his Address

assailant ought to be prepared with

unimpeachable testimony in support to the Public, upon the Injurious Tendency of the London Female

of his bypothesis ; and he should not

presume to come before the public, Penitentiary. By G. Hodson. 18.

resting upon the illusory phantom A Defence of the London Female of a prospective speculation only,

Penitentiary, in Reply to the Charge but on undeniable matter of fact. of Dangerous Tendency, &c. in a It is a very serious thing to urge Letter to T. Pellatt, Esq. Secre- any objections to the probable pretary. By W. Shrubsole. 1$. 6d. judice of a useful Institution, unless A Letter to W. Hale, Esq. in An- these objections have been brought

swer to his Address upon the Dan. to the test of experience, and sancgerous Tendency, &c. By R. Hawa tioned by repeated observation. ker, D. D. ls. 6d.

We premise these remarks, not The London Female Penitentiary

from any apprehension that this ex

cellent charity will suffer in the esdefended, or a Reply, &c. By

timation of the public by the disJ. Clarke, 1s. 6d.

cussion; for Truth, the more she is Cursory Remarks on a Recent Pub. inspected, the more lovely she will

lication, addressed to the Public, appear. If this work or institution, upon the Dangerous Tendency of therefore, be of man, it will come the London Female Penitentiary. to dought; but if it be of God, ye By Juvenis. 18.

cannot overthrow it, lest, baply, ye

be found even to fight against After the lapse of so long a pe- God." riod as 50 years, during which the Knowing, therefore, as we do, Magdalep Hospital has existed, and that much good has resulted from the refuted objections inade against similar Institutions, and even from thal Charity in its commencement, this, though yet in its infancy, we have, near y as locg, slumbered in shall not deem it our duty, in this oblivion, we cannot but express our review, to be satisfied with mere surprize that ihe principle upon speculative predictions, in order to which the London Female Peniten. prove the pripciple of the London tiary is founded,' should, in the opin Female Penitentiary to be unsouod; pion of Mr. Halę, yet remain to be but facts must be opposed to facts,

to produce an even scale in the ing as be can possibly be, notwithhands of impartial Justice.. . standing all his allowed knowledge

In the discussion of the principles of parochial matters, and of decid, 80 opposed by this author, he di- ing, by a reference to the laws of vides the subject into Two Parts: the land and daily experience. He maintains, 1st, That the result of • We do therefore, on our part, 1st, the operation of the London Female Maintain that Workhouses never Penitentiary will never lessen, but were designed by the Legislature as increase, the sum of prostitution;' asylums for this unfortunate class of and, 2dly, "That it cannot be sup- persons; 2dly, Thạt, in point of ported by precept or example from fact, such persons would be, as they the word of God.

generally have been, refused admis• After making some remarks on sion into Work houses, unless they Letters published in this Magazine were either diseased or unable to in September and November last, work ; 3dly, From the most moon from the pen of Dr. Hawker, which derate computation of the number Mr. Hale supposes to have been ap- of prostitutes, compared with the plicable to the London Female Pe number of Workhouses in and about nitentiary, but which were written the metropolis, we feel no fear of with reference to a similar Institu: contradiction in asserting most potion at Plymouth, our author thus sitively, That all the Work houses toproceeds :-" To those who have gether would not contain two-thirds even but a very superficial acquaint of the number of street - walkers; ance with the Poor Laws of Eng. and this, even to the utter exclusion land, it will immediately occur, that of all other paupers t.. there is no necessity for any one wouWe are, therefore, apprehensive man, however desperate her charac- that Mr. Hale has himself, in his ter, to continue in prostitution a sin bold assertion, libelled Parish-Offi. gle hour, to secure her daily support: cers, Magistrates, and the Legisla. to insist upon the contrary of this, ture' itself, who, if his statement is to libel the Parish - Officers, the were true, are highly blameable for Magistrates, and the Legislature of not advertising, in the most public the kiogdom.''

manner, where and how these un. We most readily confess, that our happy women may find a shelter, acquaintance with the complicated and in respect to the parish-officers system of the Poor Laws of England in particular, for being so culpable is but superficial; yet we feel no as, in many instances, they, have danger of being found guilty, either been, in refusing these poor creaintentionally or in point of fact, of tures the refuge they have some. libelling the three august, bodies of times sought: but even admitting men referred to, in venturing to as that there were room for them all sert, That the position laid down by in the Workhouses, we leave it to Mr. Hale is not tenable...

: our readers to judge, how far a We are much obliged to Mr. Haleprompt admission into them, so for having, in this part of his work, confidently recommended by Mr. given the public an opportunity of Hale as practicable, would tend to anticipating the probable fallacy of their reformation ! his speculative opinions, by offering: Mr. Hale then states the object of to their notice something of a tan- this Institution, which is to afford gible nature; the truth or falsehood an asylum to females who, having of which they are as capable of judg. deviated from the paths of Virtue,

+ A gentleman, well - acquainted with parochial affairs, in a Leta ter (which we have seen) written in commendation of Mr. Blair's Reply to Mr. Hale (published by Seeley) observes, that " Mr. Hale has permitted his zeal to exceed his discretion, when he wished to impress on the public mind a remedy through the medium of Workhouses. We have 60 of these houses withir the understood limits of the metropolis ; and the whole can only afford an asylum for 17,000 paupers; and they lie three in a bed during the winter months ! -How shall we there find an asylum for 30,000 prostitutes ?'

are desirous of being 'restored by re. vepted & gross a mis-statement as ligious instruction, and the forma. that the doors of the asylum are tion of moral and industrious ha. for ever shut against them;" for the bits, to a respectable station in 80. doors are closed against them only ciety." I would,' says Mr. Hale, WAILE they are in that state, but as

here, in the first place, observe, widely open to them afterwards as That any Institution which em- to any other objects. braces and proceeds upon this prin- As to the epithet: Filthy adepts at ciple, should meet with every en deceil,' Mr. Hale has, we think, for couragement that is in my power a moment overlooked that forcible to give it; but I never recollect appeal to every Christian breast : meeting with a greater difference 'Who maketh thee to differ? between the theoretical sketch of and the more fully any Cbristian is aný system and its practical execu- led to view the chambers of Imation, than there is between the pro- gery' in his own heart (Jer. xvii. 9.) fessed object of the Female Peniten- he will more readily acknowledge tiary and the plan upon which it is that the outbreakings of sin. in conducted.' To evince this great others, 'is but an external effect of difference, he remarks, Females, the filthy deceitfulness and despe. who having deviated from the paths rate wickedncss' which work even of Virtue, and are desirous of being within his own bosom,,, restored by religious instruction, are Mr.Hale next proceeds to shew the not to be found in the nocturnal influence which he thinks this plan is walks of abandoned prostitution, nor likely to produce upon the youth of in the brothels of iniquity;' for if both sexes, destitute of the fear of they have been seduced, preg. God, especially female servants, nancy,' he proceeds to state, is ge- who wiit, he imagines, be allured to nerally the consequence; but the vice, by seeing abandoned prosti. doors of this "usylum are for ever tutes fostered and rewarded, while closed against such, unless they de- the proservation of their own virtue sceud into prostitution"; then they goes unrewarded. He illustrates can have immediate access into this this part of bis argument by obsery. promising asylum, by adding to all ing, That there are two things their other crimes the sins of hypo. which predominate in the youthful crisy and lying. Yes; these filthy breast : " A vain curiosity and adepts at deceit know, says he, they a vain presuniption that they have onlyto patch up a few falsehoods can leave off sinning when they to procure admission, &c. P. 12. please ;' hus prompting them to * We are sorry to differ from Mr. give full swing to their desires ; and Hale, for whose character we enter- fancying, after a long sinful course, taiii much respect; but it appears to they can at any time gain admisos a very extraordinary assumption şion to the Penitentiary, and have indeed, that no poor fernales in better wages and rewards than they the nocturnal walks of abandoned ever had before, and in like manprostitution, or in brothels, sigh for ner, that similar effe cts must be exdeliverance from their !wretched pected on those who live in a state course of life! Mr.Hale should have of private prostitution. known better than to have asserted in order to exainine the strength any thing in the shape of a negative, of this argument (if an argument it which cannot possibly be proved. may be termed) we should first exThere exists, however, in the annals anide the mighty lure held out by of the Magdalen and other similar the Society to produce this appre. "Institutions, abundant proof of the hondesi mass of evit. By the Rules Bontrary ; and to the Reports of of the Society, partly slated by Mr. those Institutions we must beg leave llale himseit (p. 19) there are proto refcr.

bationary wards, and wards for per: A very little attention, on the part sons fully admitted after probation ef Mr. Hale, to the Rules of the (the time of probation being two Society, in respect to the admission months); so that unless they con. af pregnant womnen, would have pre- * tinue to be penitent, they can never

to produce an even scale in the ing as be can possibly be, notwithhands of impartial Justice. ... standing all his allowed knowledge

In the discussion of the principle, of parochial matters, and of decid. 80 opposed by this author, he di- ing, by a reference to the laws of vides the subject into Two Parts: the land and daily experience. He maintains, 1st, That the result of • We do therefore, on our part, 1st the operation of the London Female Maintain that Workhouses never Penitentiary will never lessen, but were designed by the Legislature as increase, the sum of prostitution ;' asylums for this unfortunate class of and, 2dly, "That it cannot be sup- persons; - Adly, That, in point of ported by precept or example from fact, such persons would be, as they the word of God.'

generally have been, refused admis. • After making some remarks, on sion into Workhouses, unless they Letters published in this Magazinė were either diseased or unable to in September and November last, work ;3dly, From the most mo.. from the pen of Dr. Hawker, which derate computation of the number Mr. Hale supposes to have been ap- of prostitutes, compared with the plicable to the London Female Pe number of Workhouses in and about nitentiary, but which were written the metropolis, we feel no fear of with reference to a similar Institu- contradiction in asserting most potion at Plymouth, our author thus sitively, That all the Work houses toproceeds: To those who have gether would not contain two-thirds even but a very superficial acquaints of the number of street - walkers; ance with the Poor Laws of Eng- and this, even to the utter exclusion land, it will immediately occur, that of all other paupers t.. there is no necessity for any one won - We are, therefore, apprehensive man, however desperate her charac- that Mr. Hale has himself, in his ter, to continue in prostitution a sin bold assertion, 'libelled Parish-Offi. gle hour, to secure her daily support: cers, Magistrates, and the Legisla. to insist upon the contrary of this, ture' itself, who, if his statement is to libel the Parish - Officers, the were true, are highly blameable for Magistrates, and the Legislature of not advertising, in the most public the kingdom.'.

manner, where and how these un. We most readily confess, that our happy women may find a shelter; acquaintance with the complicated and in respect to the parish-officers system of the Poor Laws of England in particular, for being so culpable is but superficial ; yet we feel no as, in many instances, they have danger of being found guilty, either been, in refusing these poor crea intentionally or in point of fact, of tures the refuge they have somelibelling the three august. bodies of times sought: but even admitting men referred to, in venturing to as- that, there were room for them all sert, That the position laid down by in the Workbouses, we leave it to Mr. Hale is not tenable..

our readers to judge, how far a • We are much obliged to Mr. Hale prompt admission into them, so for having, in this part of his work, confidently recommended by Mr. given the public an opportunity of Hale as practicable, would tend to anticipating the probable fallacy of their reformation ! his speculative opinions, by offering Mr. Hale then states the object of to their notice something of a tan- this Institution, 'which is to afford gible nature; the truth or falsehood an asylum to females who, having of which they are as capable of judg. deviated from the paths of Virtue,

+ A gentleman, well - acquainted with parochial affairs, in a Leta ter (which we have seen) written in commendation of Mr. Blair's Reply to Mr. Hale (published by Seeley) observes, that " Mr. Hale has permitted his zeal to exceed his discretion, when he wished to impress on the public mind a remedy through the medium of Workhouses. We have 60 of these houses within the understood limits of the metropolis; and the whole can only afford an asylum for 17,000 paupers; and they lie three in a bed during the winter months ! How shall we there find an asylum for 30,000 prostitutes ?'

S %

are desirous of being 'restored by te vepted so gross a mis-statement as ligious instruction, and the forma. that the doors of the asylum are tion of moral and industrious ha for ever shut against them;' for the bits, to a respectable station in 80. doors are closed against then only cicty I would,' says Mr. Hale, WAILE they are in that state, but as

here, in the first place, observe, widely open to them afterwards as That any Institution which em- to any other objects. braces and proceeds upon this prin. As to the epithet! Filthy adepts at ciple, should meet with every endeceit,' Mr. Häle has, we think, for couragéinent that is in my power a moment overlooked that forcible to give it; but I never recollect appeal to every Christian breast : meeting with a greater difference "Who maketh thee to differ?? between the theoretical sketch of and the brore fully any Christian is aný system and its practical execu- led to view the chambers of Imation, than there is between the pro- gery' in his own heart (Jer. xvii. 9. fessed object of the Female Peniten- he will more readily acknowledge tiary and the plan upon which it is that the outbreakings of sin in conducted.' To evince this great others is but an external: effect of difference, he remarks, Females, the filthy deceitfalness and despewho having deviated from the paths rate wickedncss' which work even of Virtue, and are desirous of being within his own bosom. .,. restored by religious instruction, are Mr. Hale next proceeds to shew the not to be found in the nocturnal influence which he thinks this plan is walks of abandoned prostitution, nor likely to produce upon the youth of in the brothels of iniquity ;' for if both sexes, destitute of the fear of they have been seduced, preg. God, especially female servants, pancy,' he proceeds to state, is ge- who wiit, he imagines, be allured to nerally the consequence; but the vice, by seeing abandoned prosti. doors of this asylum are for ever tutes fostered and rewarded, while closed against such, unless they de- the preservation of their own virtue sceud into prostitution"; then they goes unrewarded. He illustrates can have immediate access into this this part of bis argument by observ. promising asylum, by addiog to all ing, That there are two things their other criines the sins of hypo- which predominate in the youthful crisy and lying. Yes; these flihy breast :-* A vain curiosity and adepts al deceit know,'says he, they à vain presuniption that they have onlyto patch up a few falsehoods can leave off sinning when they to procure admission, &e. P. 12. please ;' Thus prompting them to

We are sorry to differ from Mr. give full swing to their desires ; and Hale, for whose character we enter- fancying, after a long sinful course, taid much respect; but it appearg to they can at any timne gain admis as a very extraordinary assumption şion to the Penitentiary, and have indeed, that no poor females in better wages and rewards than they the nocturnal walks of abandoned ever had before ; and in like manprostitution, or in brothels, sigh for ner, that similar elit ets must be exdeliverance from their !wretched pected on those who live in a state course of life! Mr.Hale should have of private prostitution. known better than to have asserted in order to exainine the strength any thing in the shape of a negative, of this argument (if an argument it which cannot possibly be proved. may be termed) we should first ex. There exists, however, in the aunals anige the mighty lure held out by of the Magdalen and other similar the Society to produce this appre. "Tustitutious, abundant proof of the honderd mass of evit. By the Rules contrary ; and to the Reports of of the Society, partly slated by Mr. those Institutions we must beg leave IIale himseit (p. 13) there are proto refer.

bationary wards, and wards for perA very little attention, on the part sons fully admitted after probation ef Mr. Hale, to the Rules of the (the time of probation being two Society, in respect to the admissive months); res that unless they con. af pregnant wonnen, would have pre- . tinue to be penitent, they can never

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