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SIR FLEUREANT.

Take thou thy grievance to the outer hall,
But go no further hence. Soft, Master Usher;
My friend shall have an audience of the duke.
Look he be carefully bestow'd without
Till be be call'd. He is an injured man;
An injured man, and being so, yet welcome.
The grief he hath is worth its weight in gold.
Bestow him carefully without.

USHER.

This way

[Exit, with the Yeoman.

Enter the DUKES of BURGUNDY and BOURBON.

BURGUNDY.

Good morrow, Flurry. Not on us, good brother.
I grant you were we rasbly to make war,
No council summon'd, no estates convened,
Thenaught that should unhappily ensue
Might chance be charged on us, as natural guides,
And so reputed, of the youthful king.
But back'd by all the council, -yea, by all,
For I'll be warranty no voice dissents,
Back’d by the council, wherein weighty reasons
Shall be well urged-

BOURBON.

Ay, brother, there it is !
That

you have reasons of your own none doubts,
And Jacques Bonhomme will be bold to say
That reasons which are rank in Burgundy
Have been transplanted to the soil of France,
That fits them not.

BURGUNDY.

In Jacques Bonhomme's throat I'll tell him that he slanders me and lies. No soil in Christendom but fits my reasons ; No soil where virtue, chivalry, and honour Are fed and flourish, but shall fit them well. When honour and nobility fall prone In Flanders, think you they stand fast in France ? Or losing ground in France, have hope elsewhere? This by no narrow bound is circumscribed : It is the cause of chivalry at large. Though heir to Flanders I am Frenchman born, And nearer have at heart the weal of France Than

my

far off inheritance. Come, come; Lay we before the council the sad truth Of these distractions that so rock the realm,Paris possess'd by Nicholas le Flamand Where law's a nothing and the king a name ; Armies with mallets but beginning there, And gathering like the snow-wreaths in a storm Before a man hath time to get him housed, At Chalons on the Marne, Champagne, Beauvoisin, At Orleans, at Rheims, at Blois, and Rouen, And every reach of road from Paris south : Then point we to the north, where Artevelde Wields at his single will the Flemish force, Five hundred thousand swords; and ask what fate Awaits our France, if those with these unite, Bold villains both, and ripe for riving down All royalty,—thereafter or therewith Nobility !- Then strike whiles yet apart Each single foe.

BOURBON.

But Philip speaks us fair.

BURGUNDY.

As fair as false.

SIR FLEUREANT.

My lords, there's proof of that
Here close at hand; a yeoman from Tournesis,
But now arrived with news of ravage done
On the French frontier.

BURGUNDY.

There, good brother, there! There's Flemish friendship, Flemish love of peace ! Shall we make nought of this ?

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Enter the KING with a Hawk on his hand.

BURGUNDY.

How now, my royal cousin, have you done?
Can you repeat the speech ?

KING.

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O yes, good uncle. Right noble our liege councillors all, We greet you ! We have required your—'

BURGUNDY.

Presence here this day.

KING.

We have required your presence here this day
On matters of high import, which surcharge
Our royal mind, that still affects the weal
Of our beloved lieges. Much to peace
Our tender

years incline us, but-but-but-'
I'll fly my hawk, good uncle, now; to-morrow
I'll
say

the rest. Come, Jerry, Jerry, Jerry !
He is a Marzarolt, uncle, just reclaim'd ;
The best in France for flying at the fur.
Whew! Jerry, Jerry, Jerry!

BURGUNDY.

Cousin, stay.

Enter SIR FLEUREANT with the Yeoman.
Here is a worthy yeoman from Tournesis,
Who hath a tale to tell of ravage done
Upon the realm of France.

KING.

A yeoman, uncle ? Here, worthy yeoman, you shall kiss our hand. Get off there, Jerry.

[The Yeoman kneels and kisses his hand.

BOURBON.

Now, sir, from what place In France or Flanders, com'st thou?

YEOMAN.

Please your highness, 'Twas a small holding from my lord of Vergues Close to the liberties of Fontenoy.

BOURBON,

This side the bourn ?

YEOMAN.

Three miles, my lord, and long ones.

BURGUNDY. Three miles in France.

BOURBON.

And what befell thee there?

YEOMAN.

My lord, my wife and I, on Wednesday night,
Saw fires to the north and westward, up by Orcq
And round to Beau-Renard, and knew by that
The Flemish commons had been there, that late
Have roam'd through Flanders, burning where they came
The houses of the gentlemen and knights.
Then said my wife (Pierilla, if it please you)
• 'Tis well we're yeomen and of poor estate,
And that we're lieges of a mightier lord
Than was the Count of Flanders : 'tis God's mercy !
Or else might they that look from Beau-Renard
To the south and eastward, see this house on fire
To-morrow night, as we this night see theirs !'
But hardly had she said it, when due south
The sky was all on fire; and then we knew
The Flemings were in France, and Auzain burn'd.
We fled away, and looking back, beheld
Our humble dwelling flaming like a torch.
So, then, quoth I, we'll to my Lord the King,
And tell what's come to pass.

а

BURGUNDY.

Thou hast done well; Retire : His Majesty will bring thy case

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