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Reynolds, Sir Joshua, 117, his paintings of humble life, 138.
Ridicule, how far lawful, 45, &c. 51, 66. Dr. Hey's Hypothesis

respecting it, 48. Used in Scripture, 51. How far it is a test
of truth, 56. Uses of it, 59, &c. In what manner it acts
upon the mind, 61. Useful in private life, 62. Abuses of it,

63, &c. The use of it difficult, 66, 67.
Richardson, Professor, his Essays on some of Shakspeare's dramatic

characters, 223.
Richardson, Samuel, his opinion of the Stage, 111.
Rochester, Earl of, his remorse for his profligate writings, 211. His

Life, by Burnet, and character of it, by Johnson; his funeral

Sermon, by Parsons, ditto.
Rousseau, J. J. his objections to the profession of a player, 91. Re-

marks on a passage in the Roman History, 161. Ridicules

the theatre, 186.-248.
Rundle, Bishop, his opinion of the Stage, 108.

1

S.

Saints, invoked in Plays, 25. In Poems, 131.
Schiller, author of the Robbers, reprobates it, 216.
Scholar Arned, quoted, 103, 123, 143.
Scripture, borrowed to deck the writings of Poets, 139. Profanely

introduced, 156, 255.
Scripture language, profánely introduced in plays, 31. Introduced

with propriety, 158. With levity, 63, 158.
Seducer, how far he is obliged to marry her whom he has seduced,

251, 255.
Seed, his opinion of the Stage, 108.
Shakspeare, Family, 222.
Shenstone, his Elegy, describing the sorrow of a licentious amour,

225.
Siddons, Mrs. the first actress of her time, 174, 228, 236.
Skelton, Rev. Philip, his remarks on Superstition, 126.
Slave Trade, the Stage has done its part in influencing the public

mind to see the sin of it, 41, 190.
Society for the Suppression of Vice, Its prosecutions of Fortune Tellers,
145. Interferes at the opera, 222.

A reference made to
it, 261.
Socrates, a frequenter of the theatre, 103.
Solomon, Song of a Sacred drama, 10.
Solon, frequented plays, 103. His opinion of them, 104.

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Spectator, quoted, 4, 99, 105, 198, 205, 260.
Stage, the, different opinions respecting it, 4. Influence of it, 5.

Said to have been invented by the devil, 9. History of it,
ditto. The abuse of it, no argument against the use, 13.

Ob-
jected to by some as a mean of instruction, 15. The uses of it,
16, 36, &c. 210. Attempt to reform it considered Utopian, 19.
Reply, 20. The abuses of it, 23, &c. 233, 236. The Re-
ligion of it, 25, &c. 248, 349. The Morals of it, 31, &c.
Act of parliament to prevent abuses, 25. The fruits of the
Stage, 34. Many derive their morality from it, 34. Encoy-
rages duelling and suicide, 34, 166, &c. Subjects proper for
the Stage, 38, &c. 91, 174, 180, &c. 188, 189. Purified
Stage would still interest the spectators, 40, May instruct
those who do not go to better places for instruction, 41, 174.
Has taught loyalty, philanthropy, &c. 41. The will only
wanting to reform it, 42. The most probable nieans of re-
forming it, 69, &c. No time should be lost in commencing, 95.
Is in a state of improvement, 96. Frequented by the best men
in former times, 104. Opinions of various persons in favour of
it, 103, &c. The only amusement which draws persons
from an attention to self, 161.

Patience the lesson of most
Tragedies, 183. What is the chief attraction of the Stage,
186.

Not to exhibit bad characters without reserve, 231,
Sterne, Laurence, palliates swearing in his story of Le Feyre, 172.
Stevens, G. A. his song of the Storm, 155.
Styles, John, his Essay on The Character of The Stage, quoted, 4, 9,

19, 99, 100, 101, 118, 147, 184, 186, 189, 209, 239, 259. His
opinion of the profession of a player, 89, 226. Cites authorities
against the Stage, 103. His opinion of German plays, 240,

Thinks the Stage not in a state of improvement, ditto.
Suicide taught on the Stage, 34, and in other poems, 167, &c.
Superstition, weak minds subject to it, 126. How kept up in them,

14.4.
Szeifl, his Satire, 202.-235.

T.

Teniers, his pictures of low life, 188.
Terence, 102, respected by Cæsar, 104.
Terror and Pity, the great sources of Tragedy, 39, 177,
Theatrical Guardian, the, 261,

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Thirlwall, Rev. Thomas, his protest against the Royalty Theatre,

quoted, on the subject of German plays, &c. 240.
Tickel, his Lines on the Death of Addison, 128.
Tillotson, Archbishop, his sentiments respecting the Stage, 21. And

Comedy, 66.
Toby, Uncle, and Corporal Trim, 183.
Tomson, James, pourtrays love with delicacy, 163,
Treasury of Wit, quoted, 221.
Truth, the means by which we come to the knowledge of it, 56.

How far Ridicule is a test of it, 56.

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Vanbrugh, 164, 244, 257, laments his profligate writings, 214.
Vicar of Wakefield, 192.
Villiers, George, Duke of Buckingham, his miserable end, 313.
Voltaire, character of his plays, 214. The horrors of his death,

215. His character by Cowper, ditto.--248.

W.

Watson, Bishop, his Letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury, quoted,

104. His speech in the House of Lords, 149.
Watts, Dr. his opinion of the Stage, 107, 249. His Essays, quoted,

123. His character as a Poet, 217.
West, Mrs. her opinion of the Stranger, Pizarro, and John Bull, 240.

&c. Her Letters to a Young Lady, quoted, 240, 243, 245,

249, 252, 255. Letters to a Young Man, 248.
Weyland, John, Esq. Jun. his Letter to a Country Gentleman, quoted,

239.
White, Henry Kirke, his Poem of the Christiad, 129.
Whitehead, William, his lines to Garrick, quoted, 210.
Wilberforce, William, Esq. his Practical view of Christianity, quoted,

101.
William and Margaret, Ballad of, 144.
Williams, Mrs. the Fortune-teller, 145.
Wilson, Bishop, his Maxims, quoted, 83, 240, 247.

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Wise Woman, 145.
Wit, how far lawful, 44, &c. 50. What it is, 46. Locke's definition

of it, 47. The ornament or seasoning of conversation, 47, 58,
66. A faculty peculiar to man, 51. Instances of it in Scrip-
ture, 51. Uses of it, 56, &c. 59, 197, &c. Abuses of it,

63, &c.
Witchcraft, believed in, in these days, 28, 146. Belief in it kept up

by the Stage, 144, 145.
Mitches, the introduction of them on the Stage censured, 28. Tends

to keep up the belief in them, 29, 144.
Witherspoon, John, his Serious Inquiry into the Nature and Effects

of the Stage, quoted, 4, 7, 15, 19, 45, 55, 99, 100. His re-
marks on the profession of a player, 89, 90. States the

essentials of a theatre, 224, 236.
Wond, his Athenæ Oxonienses, quoted, 211.
World without Souls, quoted, 152, 23).
Wrangham, Rev. Francis, his Poem of The Holy Land; Invokes

the Spirit of Cowper, 128.
Writers for the Stage, their duties, 73, 221. Instances of repent.

ance in those who have written to the corrupt taste of their
times, 74, 211, &c. Their writings shew few marks of their
being Christians, 74, &c. Mr. Foster's remarks on them,
75, &c. Commendable instances of their seeing their errors and
amending, 216. No excuse for writing profanely, 221.

Y.

Young, Dr. Night Thoughts, instances of heathenism, 123, 136.

Invocations, 124, 131. Sentiments on Wit, 197. His
Centaur not fabulous, 198, 205. His character as a Poet, 217.

Z.

Zeal without Innovation, quoted, 230, 258.
Zimmerman, on Sclitude, character of the Work, 248.

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B.

Damon and Pythias, 183.
Divorce, 164.

Don Juan, 144.
Barbarossa, 189.
Battle of Hastings, 178.

Douglas, 100, 126, 128, 135, 164,
Battle of Hexham, 125, 128, 158,

178, 180, 181, 183, 233,
182.
Beaux Stratagem, 174.
Beggar's Opera, 173, 174, 235.
Belle's Stratagem, 157, 180. Earl of Essex, 183.
Benevolent Planters, 190.

Edward and Eleanora, 221.
Birth-Day, 181, 183.

Egyptian Festival, 190.
Bon Ton, 199.

Electra, 221.

English Merchant, 181, 194.
C.

F.
Castle Spectre, 190.
Çato, 167, 189.

Fair Penitent, 163, 167, 181, 183,
Chapter of Accidents, 253.

249, 249, 253.
Children in the Wood, 188. False Colours, 183, 200.
Christmas Tale, 72.

False Delicacy, 163.
Clandestine Marriage, 199. Farmer, 181.
Comus, 138.

Farm House, 238.
Conscious Lovers, 137, 163, 164, Fashionable Lover, 137, 181, 183.
166, 181, 183,

Fatal Dowry, 181.

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