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To leave you so, but it were vain for me
To share your risk, who cannot aid

your

end. SIR FLEUREANT (discovering Van Muck). Whom have we here ? a listener ? God forbid ! And yet he seems attentive, and his ears Are easy of approach, the covered way, Scarp, counterscarp, and parapet, is rased. Holloa, sir, are you there! Give you good-day! What think you we were saying ?

VAN MUCK.

I'm hard of hearing, sir, I ask your pardon.

SIR FLEUREANT.

Oh! we can pardon that; what, deaf-stone-deaf?

VAN MUCK.

No, sir, thank God ! no deafer than yourself,
But slowish, sir, of hearing.

SIR FLEUREANT.

What, snail-slow ?

VAN MUCK.

No, sir, no slower than another man,
But not so quick of hearing, sir, as some,
Being a little deaf.

SIR FLEUREANT.

Content thee, friend; Thine ears are sharper than thine apprehension. But wherefore want they flaps ? who docked them

thus ?

VAN MUCK.

It is no trouble nor no loss to you,
Whoever did it.

SIR FLEUREANT.

Pardon me, my friend,
It troubles me, and doth offend mine eyes,
To see thee lack those handles to thy head.
Tell me who snipped them ?

VAN MUCK.

'Twas my lord, the regent.

SIR FLEUREANT.

The regent ? (To the HERALD.) Upon this I go to

work.

The regent ? and you

wait
upon

him here?

VAN MUCK.

I wait to ask him for my company:
I was the captain of a company.

HERALD

What, took he thy command away besides ?

VAN MUCK.

Yea, sir.

HERALD.

And wherefore? what was thy offence ?

VAN MUCK.

I was a little mastered, sir, with drink,
The night we carried Yerken, and a maid
That ran upon me, sir, I know not how,
Forswore herself, and said I forced her will.

SIR FLEUREANT.

Well.

VAN MUCK.

And 'twas this that lost me my command.

SIR FLEUREANT.

Impossible! I've done as much myself
A thousand times.

VAN MUCK.

'Twas nothing, sir, but this.

SIR FLEUREANT.

Oh, monstrous ! and you ask him to replace you?

VAN MUCK.

Yea, sir, to give me my command again.

SIR FLEUREANT. .
And wilt thou ask him to replace thine ears ?

VAN MUCK.
No, sir.

SIR FLEUREANT.
You'd best; for you'll succeed as soon.
I've heard that never did he change his mind
But once, since he was regent ; once he did ;
'Twas when he kindly pardoned Peter Shultz.
He changed his mind and hung him.

VAN MUCK.

By our lady!
I would not ask him if I knew for certain
He would deny me.

SIR FLEUREANT.

What, deny thee ? hang thee. Take service with another lord—leave him ; Thou hast been foully dealt with. Never hope To conquer pride with humbleness, but turn To them that will be proud to use thee well. I'll show thee many such, and to begin, Here is myself. What lack’st thou ? Money? See -I am provided : hold me forth thy hand;

The regent left thee hands; was that his skill ?
The injury that disables is more wise
Than that which stings—a hand he left to take-
And here's to fill it-and a hand to strike
Look not amazed, I ask thee not to lift it ;
I ask thee but to carry me a letter
As far as Bruges.

VAN MUCK.

Sir, I'll be bound to do it.

SIR FLEUREANT.

And are there many men besides thyself
That have lost rank and service in the camp?

VAN MUCK.

It was but yesterday two constables
Had their discharge.

SIR FLEUREANT.

And why were they dismissed ?

VAN MUCK.

'Twas by the regent's order ; 'twas, he said, Because they made more riots in the camp Than they prevented.

SIR FLEUREANT.

He is hard to please.

VOL. II.

E

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