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life,” which will constitute an habit, you will never leave off in heaven-“ Lord to whom shall we go—Thou hast the words of eternal life!”

Now to God, the Father, Son and Holy Ghost, gc.

FINIS.

THE LARGE UPPER ROOM

OF THE

Mind of Man, Being sacramentally prepared for Christ's

Divine presence and abode.

А

SERMON

ON

MARK XIV. 15.

And he will shew you a large upper room furnished

and prepared : there make ready for us.

Preached at HULL, Dec. 1st 1803.

BY THE REV.

G. NICHOLSON,

LATE PERPETUAL CURATE OF LITTLE BUDWORTH, CHESHIRE.

London: Printed by W. Hersee, St. Mary Axe ; AND SOLD BY L. B. SEELEY, FLEET STREET; T. HAMILTON, PATERNOSTER ROW; AND WILLIAMS AND CO.

STATIONER'S COURT.

1817.

Price One Shilling.

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A SERMON.

MARK XIV. 15.

And he will shew you a large upper room

furnished and prepared: there make ready for us, *

SAINT Peter observes that “no prophecy of Scripture is of any private interpretation.” The Lord spake according to representation, or in parabolical and figurative language; and every thing came to pass in his incarnate progress, according to divine Providence. Therefore, even historical circumstances in the Word, are recorded for our spiritual instruction and experimental application. Far fetched expositions, incongruous comparisons, flights of fancy, and enthusiastic conjectures, are to be avoided. But, even these would do us no harm, should divine truth and eternal use govern the excursions of novelty and ingenuity. But the doctrine of analogy, which is a language and a science of celestial extraction, stands not in such a predicament. It is orderly, infallible, useful, rational, and divine. It is comprehensible, yet mysterious; adapted to the apprehension of the natural man, and also to that of the spiritual man.

* Many years after writing this Sermon, the Author was well pleased to find Mr. Burkitt's explanation of the same passage, perfectly analogous to his own, though apparently variegated, or diversified.

It is therefore suited to the progressive order of human instruction, and leads to the Lord and heaven, in the most diversified, pleasing, and effectual manner. And as religion is generally esteemed the dryest subject of all others, it is necessary to give it all the colouring which the pencil of divine inspiration hath most richly and copiously enabled us to give it. Being so important, we cannot too often contemplate the subject; being so extensive, we cannot too critically and variously pursue it : and thus perpetual instruction will be converted into perpetual confirmation.

Under the impression of these considerations, Į humbly solicit' your attention to

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