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" As a sick girl. Ye gods, it doth amaze me A man of such a feeble temper should So get the start of the majestic world And bear the palm alone. "
Osgood's Progressive Fifth Reader: Embracing a System of Instruction in the ... - Página 429
por Lucius Osgood - 1858 - 480 páginas
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William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare - 1989 - 1280 páginas
...write his speeches in their books, Alas, it cried, 'Give me some drink, Titinius,' As a sick girl. : here do I throw down this, If he may be repeal'd,...BOLINGBROKE. These differences shall all rest under [Flourish and shout. MARCUS BRUTUS. Another general shout! I do believe that these applauses are For...
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Power Plays: Shakespeare's Lessons in Leadership and Management

John O. Whitney, Tina Packer - 2002 - 320 páginas
...them all, could be tempted by power. Cassius stirs up Brutus's indignation toward Caesar by saying: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. JULIUS CAESAR (1.2, 133-36) Cassius continues to work on Brutus's ambition: Men...
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Structure and Agency in Everyday Life: An Introduction to Social Psychology

Gil Richard Musolf - 2003 - 353 páginas
...write his speeches in their books, Alas, it cried, "Give me some drink, Titinius," As a sick girl, Ye gods, it doth amaze me A man of such a feeble temper...start of the majestic world And bear the palm alone. (Julius Caesar, Act I, Scene ii) Thus, ressentiment may issue in action when the conditions from which...
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Excel Preliminary English

David Mahony - 2003 - 282 páginas
...astounding life, petty events are used to strike down a great man. Cassius concludes after these examples: Ye gods, it doth amaze me A man of such a feeble temper...start of the majestic world And bear the palm alone. His case is not convincing; it is abusive of its object. Yet it helps to bring Brutus into the plot....
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Play

Frank Julian Philips - 2003 - 179 páginas
...soraething is nothing, or the contrary. I quote a passage from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar'. Cassius: "Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world. Like...under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time our masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in...
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Shakespeare Made Easy: Julius Caesar

Tanya Grosz - 2003 - 46 páginas
...eye sees not itself but by reflection, by some other thing." Act one, Scene 2, Brutus to Cassius 2. "It doth amaze me, a man of such a feeble temper should...start of the majestic world, and bear the palm alone." Act one, Scene 2, Cassius to Brutus (continued) Caesar and Current Events (continued) Group 2 1 . "Men...
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An Eye for Hitchcock

Murray Pomerance - 2004 - 306 páginas
...discussion between Cassius and Brutus about the ability of a weak man to rise to power. Cassius states: Ye gods, it doth amaze me A man of such a feeble temper...under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in...
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Going Deeper: How to Make Sense of Your Life when Your Life Makes No Sense

Jean-Claude Koven - 2004 - 436 páginas
..."Let me offer instead Julius Caesar — liberally paraphrased, I might add, by William Shakespeare: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...To find ourselves dishonorable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that...
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Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life

George Eliot - 2004 - 744 páginas
...224 BCE. There is an echo here of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar (1623), Act 1, Scene 2, lines 133-35: "Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world/ Like...peep about/ To find ourselves dishonorable graves." Controlled bleeding and raising of blisters, treatments associated with the outmoded medical practices...
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The Social Life of Emotions

Larissa Z. Tiedens, Colin Wayne Leach, Keith Oatley - 2004 - 360 páginas
...Cassius, a literary prototype of the envying person, as he protests the honors being heaped on Caesar: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. (Shakespeare, 1599/1934, p. 41) These words show an important quality of envy. The envying person notices...
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